should

that (pronoun)

In the English Grammar Profile, there are two similar points at A2 in the category of PRONOUN/demonstratives: Point 20 is defined as: ‘that’ as a pronoun to refer back to something which has already been mentioned Point 28: ‘that’ as a pronoun with singular reference For example: No, it‘s nowhere near that. listen That‘s why I brought you here. An iWeb search for: …

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verb + object + clause

Point 12 in the category of VERBS/patterns is defined: verbs, typically reporting verbs, followed by a noun or pronoun as the indirect object and a clause with or without ‘that’, as the direct object. *Note some of our search results are not indirect objects.  However, the A2 complexity is still there with relative clauses. _VV …

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reporting verbs

In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 18 in the category of VERBS/patterns is defined as: reporting verbs, especially mental process verbs, with a clause as the direct object, without ‘that’, especially in informal contexts. For example: I hope you are doing well.   *notably, in the English Grammar Profile examples, all the verbs but ‘said’ are in the present …

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maybe | perhaps

A2 Point 13 in the category of MODALITY/adverbs: certainty and possibility (‘maybe’, ‘perhaps’), before a clause or ellipted clause. *Note that ‘maybe’ is also listed at A1. And ‘perhaps’ is A2 in the EVP regardless of position. An iWeb search for: . maybe|perhaps * * * 1 . MAYBE IT ‘S BECAUSE 2541 2 . …

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adverbs in mid position

Here’s an example of an adverb after a modal verb + academic collocation: We would likely address these issues one after the other in a sequential way. listen to this sentence In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 30 in the category of ADVERBS: MID POSITION between the subject and the main verb and after modal verbs, auxiliary verbs and ‘be’. General points such as these do not …

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manner adverbs

Point 28 in ADVERBS is defined: limited range of manner adverbs and adverb phrases to modify how something happens. PELIC STUDENTS: The most important thing is to practise because with no practise, you will forget quickly. Arabic male level 3 writing class.   Yesterday I woke up early because I had a test. Arabic male level 2 writing class. *’early’ is more of a time adverb. A search in iWeb for: _VV *ly_RR . 1 …

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modal verb (question)

Here are more overlapping points across the English Grammar Profile.  We have included their examples when needed too elaborate: A2 point 14 in CLAUSES: AFFIRMATIVE interrogative clauses (‘yes/no’ forms) with modal auxiliary verbs. Would you like to come with me? Will you go with me? Can I come tomorrow to collect it? (Can you|we…? is listed at A1) Shall we meet at 7.30 pm? (Here are …

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The thing + CLAUSE COMPLEMENT (front position)

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 40 in the category of NOUNS is defined as: the noun phrase ‘The thing’ in front position, with a clause complement, to give focus to something. *This grammar point overlaps others at B1 and there is a slight overlap with B2. A search in iWeb corpus for: . The …

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which one

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 44 in the category of PRONOUNS/substitution is defined as: ‘one’ after ‘which’ in indirect questions to refer to one of two or more options. For example: If I were to show you these two urban scenes, and I were to ask you which one is more beautiful, which one would you say? TED *not all the examples are ‘indirect questions’ in the EGP examples. A search in iWeb for: which one …

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BOTH | A FEW

Point 61 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity is defined as: ‘BOTH’, ‘A FEW’, ‘ANOTHER’ as subject and object pronouns. *We have covered the use of ‘another’ here. A search in iWeb corpus for: . both _V 1 . BOTH ARE 48684 2 . BOTH HAVE 15241 3 . BOTH WERE 15188 4 . BOTH WILL …

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himself | herself | myself | yourself

There are three very similar B1 points in the English Grammar Profile in the Category of PRONOUNS/singular reflexive Point 45 is defined as: ‘myself’, ‘yourself’, ‘himself’ and ‘herself’ after prepositions where the object of the preposition is the same as the subject of the verb. Point 65 is: ‘myself’, ‘yourself’, ‘himself’ and ‘herself’ for emphasis. …

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OR questions

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 27 in the category of QUESTIONS is defined as: alternative questions with two clauses combined with ‘or’. A search in iWeb for or _V _P * ? 1 OR AM I WRONG? 621 2 OR DOES IT MATTER? 287   Villanovan Do you view all these changes in entertainment as good or bad, or does it matter at all? *Note …

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WH- (reported question)

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 10 in the category of REPORTED SPEECH is defined as: ‘wh-‘questions using a reporting verb + ‘wh-‘word + clause, with a change of pronoun and tense shift where relevant For example: I once asked a really bright student what he hoped to learn from me. TED When asked what the biggest challenge was in making the film, William Joyce says, not giving up. listen A search in iWeb …

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If + PRESENT SIMPLE + MODAL CLAUSE

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 74 in the category of CLAUSES/conditional is defined as: PRESENT SIMPLE ‘IF’ CLAUSE + MODAL, FUTURE, POSSIBLE OUTCOME: introduce a possible future condition, with modal verbs in the main clause, to talk about a possible result. A search in TED corpus for expert examples: If you‘ve got a couple of final words you want to share, that would be great. listen So if you look that up, you can hear more of those tunes. listen PELIC …

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the reason why

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 63 in CLAUSES is defined as: THE REASON WHY: defining relative clauses with ‘why’ after ‘reason’, to give an explanation and for focus. *Note that “the reason that…” is B2.  A search in iWeb for: the * reason why 1 THE MAIN REASON WHY 8371 2 THE ONLY REASON WHY …

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HOW + adjective + clause (exclamation)

An ‘exclamation’ means: a remark expressing surprise or strong emotion. How wonderful that you came. How nice to see you! In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 48 in CLAUSES phrases/exclamations is defined as: ‘HOW’ + ADJECTIVE + CLAUSE A search in iWeb for: . How _JJ _P _V 1 . HOW IMPORTANT IT IS 103 2 . HOW LUCKY WE ARE 97 …

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If so (ellipted)

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 43 in the category of CLAUSES/conditional is defined as: ELLIPTED ‘IF SO’, CONFIRMING refer to a previous direct or indirect ‘yes-no’ question where the answer might be ‘yes’.   For example: But then I began to wonder whether a game or an app can really change attitudes and behaviors, and if so, can I measure that change?   A search in iWeb for: ? If so * * 1 …

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