ADVERBS

had better

Surprisingly, there is no entry in the English Grammar Profile for the phrase ‘had better’.  In the English Vocabulary Profile, ‘had better’ with the meaning ‘should’ is listed at A2. You had better get out of this room and back downstairs right away. listen A search for collocates in COCA of: had better_RRR 1 START 82 2 PREPARED 59 You had better be prepared to push yourself harder than …

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almost identical

‘almost identical‘ is an expert example of a C1 range of grammar and vocabulary which is also academic collocation. Indeed, as you know, the new will is almost identical to the old but for the disposition of a few items. This draft is almost identical to what was released. listen When we look for these words with more words between them it isn’t the same modification: You‘re almost definitely not going to find two identical snowflakes.

conjunctive adverbs

We have an A2 and B1 grammar post about linking adverbs and subordinating conjunctions. However, sometimes in grammar, there are many terms such as ‘conjunctive adverb’ etc. According to Wikipedia: A conjunctive adverb, adverbial conjunction, or subordinating adverb is an adverb that connects two clauses by converting the clause it introduces into an adverbial modifier …

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comparative of much

Students often ask me “what is the comparative of much?” I am guessing that they want to know about ‘much’ as an adverb meaning ‘nearly’ or ‘approximately’. (It has many forms) In which case, I would say that ‘more’ is the comparative of ‘much’.  And for that matter, the superlative is ‘most’. For example: They …

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GO + adverb

In the English Vocabulary Profile at B1: go badly/well, etc. develop in a particular way For example: When things go wrong, do you think they‘re gonna be there for us? listen   An iWeb search for: GO _RR 1 GO WRONG 92674 2 GO STRAIGHT 36142 3 WENT WRONG 32995 4 GOES WRONG 28765 5 GOES WELL 28092 6 GO RIGHT 27200 7 GO WELL 25692 8 …

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4 part complex phrases

An iWeb search for _*41 _*42 _*43 _*44 1 FROM TIME TO TIME 178222 (complex adverbial phrase) Maybe it would’ve done you some good to have some questions from time to time. listen 2 FOR THE MOST PART 154857 (complex adverbial phrase) But for the most part, they live in complete isolation quite unaware there are other people in the world. listen 3 ON THE PART OF 74232 (complex prepositional phrase) We feel it‘s a publicity stunt on the part of Malcolm X. listen 4 …

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little to

How is ‘little to‘ tagged in iWeb corpus? 1 LITTLE (DA1) TO (TO) 35055 determiner + infinitive Julie, if you just simmer down, you will see what has happened here has little to do with our relationship. NSFW example 6 LITTLE (JJ) TO (II) 6944 7 LITTLE (RR22) TO (II) 6395 adverbial phrase modifying prepositional phrase A little to the left, a little to the right, somebody could have gotten hurt. listen 19 LITTLE (JJ) TO (TO) 1272 23 LITTLE (RR) …

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verb + adverb + adjective + TO infinitive

This structure is at least B1 since it will often catch modality with hedging and emphasis.  It either will show the ability to place adverbs in the middle position or premodify and postmodify adjectives. An iWeb search for: _V _RR _JJ _TO _VV 1 IS ALSO IMPORTANT TO NOTE 3883 2 ‘S ALSO IMPORTANT TO …

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far superlative

The irregular superlative adverb or adjective of ‘far‘ is ‘farthest‘ or ‘furthest.’  For example: If I take one more step, it’ll be the farthest away from home I’ve ever been.   From the furthest corners of the world where the dark arts still hold sway,  he returns to us to demonstrate how nature‘s laws may be bent. listen In the English Vocabulary Profile, at A2, ‘far‘ as an adverb means: at, to or from a great distance in space or time It is also listed at B2 as an adjective …

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Verb + question word + to infinitive ‘learn how to use’

The WH-adverbs: such as ‘how’, ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘why’ are often called ‘question words’ because they typically introduce interrogative sentences.  However, in this post, we look at the way they introduce other clauses: A search in iWeb for: _V _*Q _TO _VVI   1 LEARN HOW TO USE 24468 Learn how to use it. (EVP A2 how = …

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really | always | sometimes + VERB

The first point in the English Grammar Profile! A1 point 1 in the category of ADVERBS is defined: adverbs of degree and time to modify verbs. An iWeb search for: really|always|sometimes _VV   1 REALLY WANT 213278 I really want a brother.   Listen to the pronunciation 2 REALLY LIKE 181415 3 REALLY NEED 161580 4 REALLY KNOW …

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JUST + preposition

Here’s an example of ‘just’ pre-modifying a prepositional phrase. I was a shy girl and sometimes I was just like a boy. TLC student speaking test female China B1   A2 point 3 in the category of PREPOSITIONS is defined: ‘JUST’ + to modify prepositions. An iWeb search for: just_R _II 1 JUST LIKE 495187 2 JUST IN 139921 3 JUST BEFORE 128761 4 JUST BY …

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