ADVERBS

MUCH TO + possessive noun phrase

Much to my surprise,  and Much to the surprise of someone, are ‘comment adverbial phrases’.  This structure is not listed in the English Vocabulary or Grammar Profile, so we turn to the Longman dictionary: FORMAL used to say that someone feels very surprised, embarrassed etc when something happens A search in NOW corpus for: . …

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lexical verb + IN + article + adjective + WAY (manner)

There are two points in the English Vocabulary Profile that relate to ‘way‘ in regards to manner: way MANNER C1[no plural] the manner in which someone behaves or thinks, or in which something happens For example: How do we measure changes in behavior in a meaningful way that‘s going to help us with prevention of disease,  early onset of disease, and tracking the progression of disease over a long period of time? TED in a big way INFORMAL C2 used to say that someone or something …

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nowhere else

In the English Vocabulary Profile at B1, the adverb ‘nowhere‘ means ‘not anywhere’.  At A2, ‘else’ means ‘in addition,’ ‘different’ or ‘other’.  Together the words means ‘no other place‘ Collocates of ‘nowhere else‘ in the NOW corpus: 1 GO 5041 There was nowhere else to go after Australia. TED 2 THERE 3063 3 FOUND 1726 4 WORLD 1399 5 BECAUSE 1190 …

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verb + adverb + verb + adverb + verb

While working on another piece of grammar, I noticed a complex piece of grammar that is not listed in the English Grammar Profile.  There are many grammar points that are listed that are about adverbs in the middle position, but none about two which should be listed at C2. A search in iWeb corpus for …

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Don’t get me wrong

In the English Vocabulary Profile, Don’t get me wrong INFORMAL C2 used when you do not want someone to think that you do not like someone or something For example: Now, don’t get me wrong, I am incredibly grateful to be alive,  and I am painfully aware that this struggle is a privilege that many don’t get to experience. fsc.org.au   Collocates of ‘Don’t get me wrong‘ in the MOVIE corpus: 1 N’T 917 2 LOVE 72 Don’t get me wrong, I love it. listen …

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wrongly + past participle

In the English Vocabulary Profile at C1: wrongly accused/convicted/imprisoned, etc. accused or punished unfairly or illegally For example: My father’s currently being wrongly incarcerated for 12 years. TED A search in NOW corpus for: wrongly _VVN Wrongly +  1 ACCUSED 3646 2 CONVICTED 2727 We‘re trying to help people who have been wrongly convicted. TED 3 IDENTIFIED 744 4 CLAIMED 679 5 ASSUMED 592 6 DECIDED 563 7 ATTRIBUTED 520 …

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negative future + time period + YET

In the English Vocabulary Profile at C1, YET from now and for a particular period of time in the future A search in the NOW corpus for: for a _JJ _NNT yet 1 FOR A LONG TIME YET 605 I‘m not gonna die for a long time yet. The Babadook 2 FOR A LITTLE WHILE YET 197 Dinner won’t be ready for a little while yet. Little Deaths 3 …

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yet + another | again | more

Listed in the English Vocabulary Profile at C2: yet another/more, etc. used to show that you are surprised or annoyed that something is being repeated or increased At B2,  Yet again again after something has happened or been done many times before However, this structure is also listed at B2 in the Cambridge dictionary: used …

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modal verb + YET

At C2 in the English Vocabulary Profile: could/may/might, etc. yet used to say there is still a possibility that something will happen For example: We may yet one day realize the vision of having the internet in our brains. TED And it seems like it‘s very possible that your nation, despite, actually because of the intense problems you face,  you may yet be the warning light to the world that shines most visibly, most powerfully. TED   NOW corpus search for: _VM yet _VVI 1 MAY YET PROVE 889 2 COULD YET PROVE 662 3 …

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had better

Surprisingly, there is no entry in the English Grammar Profile for the phrase ‘had better’.  In the English Vocabulary Profile, ‘had better’ with the meaning ‘should’ is listed at A2. You had better get out of this room and back downstairs right away. listen A search for collocates in COCA of: had better_RRR 1 START 82 2 PREPARED 59 You had better be prepared to push yourself harder than …

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almost identical

‘almost identical‘ is an expert example of a C1 range of grammar and vocabulary which is also academic collocation. Indeed, as you know, the new will is almost identical to the old but for the disposition of a few items. This draft is almost identical to what was released. listen When we look for these words with more words between them it isn’t the same modification: You‘re almost definitely not going to find two identical snowflakes.

conjunctive adverbs

We have an A2 and B1 grammar post about linking adverbs and subordinating conjunctions. However, sometimes in grammar, there are many terms such as ‘conjunctive adverb’ etc. According to Wikipedia: A conjunctive adverb, adverbial conjunction, or subordinating adverb is an adverb that connects two clauses by converting the clause it introduces into an adverbial modifier …

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not even

‘not even’ can be used to emphasize that something is not true or didn’t happen. It’s B1 in the English Vocabulary Profile. Here are the collocates of ‘not even’ in the movie corpus: 1 CLOSE 443 It‘s not even close! listen 2 YET 398 3 ANYMORE 215 I‘m not even allowed to swim with her anymore. listen 4 SUPPOSED 164 5 ANYONE 133 …

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