DISCOURSE MARKERS

  • A discourse marker is a word or phrase that organizes written or spoken communication into parts.

time and sequencing adverbs

‘now’ is an adverb that refers to the timing of an event.  For example: A boss like that? Now I am green with envy. listen There are a few overlapping points in the category of ADVERBS as modifiers at A2 in the English Grammar Profile. Point 25: SEQUENCING: a limited range of adverbs and adverb phrases (‘first’, ‘then’, ‘after that’) …

time and sequencing adverbs Read More »

On the + contrary | other hand | one hand

B1 Point 4 in the category of discourse markers is defined: in writing ORGANISING – range of phrases to introduce contrasting statements. The English Grammar Profile uses two examples, both of which clash against the English Vocabulary Profile: *’on the (other|one) hand’.   ‘On the contrary’ We have accidentally double posted this topic.  The other page …

On the + contrary | other hand | one hand Read More »

As for myself

Point 119 in PRONOUNS/reflexive is defined as: ‘as for myself’ as a discourse marker to introduce or focus on a personal opinion. FOR EXAMPLE: As for myself, I have some ideas about where we went wrong this time, and one day I may call on you once more. listen     TechRaptor As for myself, I am an artist in the loosest possible definition of the word; that is to say, I make art. 16 Dec 2020 A search in iWeb corpus for: . As …

As for myself Read More »

Firstly | Secondly | Finally | Actually ,

Point 49 in ADVERBs/as modifiers is defined as: adverbs as discourse markers to organise text. (position) For example: Finally, I just take a rest. PELIC STUDENT: Arabic, Male, level 3, writing class Although the title of this post lists only 4 examples that are found in the EGP examples, there are many more one could manually locate that relate …

Firstly | Secondly | Finally | Actually , Read More »

LINKING ADVERBS / SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS

Point 19 in A2 ADVERBS as modifiers is defined as: LINKING limited range of adverbs (‘also’, ‘so’, ‘however’) to show a relationship between two clauses or sentences. The EGP examples: I_PPIS1 also_RR bought_VVD ,_, so_CS I_PPIS1 decided_VVD However_RR ,_, the_AT clothes_NN2 were_VBDR cheap_JJ ._. Point in 2 A2 DISCOURSE MARKERS is: ‘so‘ to summarise, usually …

LINKING ADVERBS / SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS Read More »

introduce a comparison

In the English Grammar Profile, B2 point 10 in DISCOURSE MARKERS in writing is defined as: a range of phrases as discourse markers to introduce a comparison. There are three examples of these in the English Grammar Profile. 1. Similarly For Hitler to fail at Stalingrad would be an enormous blow to the Nazi myth. It would be an enormous blow to the war itself. Similarly, Josef Stalin was unrelenting. He would not tolerate defeat. WWII from Space   Collocates of ‘Similarly‘ (word ranking: 2809) …

introduce a comparison Read More »

CONSEQUENTLY | HENCE | THUS | THEREFORE (summarising)

In the English Vocabulary Profile, at C1, the adverb ‘hence’ means: for this reason We’ve been involved for quite a while.  Hence, the shared suite. listen At B2, the adverb ‘thus’ is used after saying a fact to introduce what then happened as a result. For example, If myth is seen as the product of a past era, it is difficult to determine at what actual moment that era ended. Thus, it is virtually impossible to state precisely when a certain mythical theme becomes a mere literary theme or to determine in general when myths are no longer being created. context   At B2, the adverb ‘consequently’ means: as …

CONSEQUENTLY | HENCE | THUS | THEREFORE (summarising) Read More »

organising opening closing phrases

In the English Grammar Profile, B2 point 8 in the category of  DISCOURSE MARKERS in writing is defined as a: range of phrases as discourse markers to open and close texts and point to conclusions, often in formal contexts. From the examples in the EGP searched in iWeb: In the English Vocabulary Profile: ‘to begin …

organising opening closing phrases Read More »