B1

B1 is an intermediate level of English. It is where most ESL students tend to be and also where most errors are made as they are learning new grammar and vocabulary.

one of

This is one of the most important documents in history. listen   An iWeb search: * * * one of 1 . THIS IS ONE OF 50763 2 THIS IS ONE OF 38872 3 . IT IS ONE OF 34196 4 . ” ONE OF 23960 5 . IT ‘S ONE OF 22692 6 , WHICH IS ONE OF 20904 7 …

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verb + adverb + adjective + TO infinitive

This structure is at least B1 since it will often catch modality with hedging and emphasis.  It either will show the ability to place adverbs in the middle position or premodify and postmodify adjectives. An iWeb search for: _V _RR _JJ _TO _VV 1 IS ALSO IMPORTANT TO NOTE 3883 2 ‘S ALSO IMPORTANT TO …

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Would you mind?

Here are the most common examples with explanations of ‘would you mind‘: Would you mind if I took your picture? Listen to the pronunciation   Point 83 at B1 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: ‘would’ to make polite requests, often in the fixed expression ‘would you mind’ ‘Would you mind’ is also B1 in the EVP and in the …

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irregular plural noun + ‘s + noun

Point 44 in the category of DETERMINERS is defined as: ‘S after irregular plural nouns to indicate possession. Here’s an expert example: Women‘s organizations were active participants from the beginning. (Listen to this sentence) A search in iWeb for: _NN2 _GE _NN We removed those that are not irregular. 1 CHILDREN ‘S HOSPITAL 34865 2 MEN ‘S BASKETBALL 22178 3 WOMEN …

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6 ways to use ‘any + comparative’

‘Any’ can be used as an adverb to mean ‘at all’ or ‘in some degree’.  In the English Vocabulary Profile, ‘any’ is listed as ADVERB B1 used in questions and negatives to emphasize a comparative adjective or adverb Do you feel any better? I can’t walk any faster. Those trousers don’t look any different from the others. Houses in this area used to be a real bargain, but they’re not cheap any more. This radio isn’t any good – I ‘ll have to buy another. She couldn’t wait any longer. *’any more’ …

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defining relative clause TO infinitive

Here’s an expert example of a defining relative clause using TO-infinitive: Several years earlier, she‘d become the first woman to ski to the South Pole. Listen to the sentence. The first woman to ski can be written in another way with the same meaning: the first woman who skied  Pearson’s GSE 56 B1+ is defined:  construct defining (restrictive) relative clauses with ‘to’ + infinitive verb …

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phrase ellipsis

Here’s a student example of verb phrase ellipsis: You need to study hard to pass the test unless you don’t want to. PELIC Arabic female level 4 grammar class Although there are a number of grammar points in the English Grammar Profile to do with Ellipsis, there are none that cover the ellipsis of phrases before or after the ‘TO’ infinitive.  Therefore, we turn to Pearson’s GSE …

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‘SO’ (end of the sentence)

I don’t quite trust the CEFR level Pearson gives to the following grammar construct. GSE 58 B1+ is defined: ‘so’ in sentence-final positions as a placeholder (substitute) for verbs and verb phrases. It was too expensive. – I told you so. John is from Seattle. – I thought so.   ‘So’ has many possible meanings and uses near the end of sentences.  When we look at the English …

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‘It is for you to decide.’ (FOR +TO infinitive clause)

Pearson’s GSE 58 B1+ clause + ‘for’ to introduce an infinitive clause with a different subject.  The important thing is for you to arrive on time. My aim is for my children to go to university. A search in iWeb for: _VB for * _TO _VVI 1 IS FOR YOU TO DECIDE 392 (most examples with this string contained ‘whether’ or ‘whether or not’ which is C2.) 2 IS FOR YOU …

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present perfect simple (unfinished)

Point 20 in the category of PAST is defined: present perfect simple: UNFINISHED refer to a state or period of time which is unlimited or indefinite. This is too hard to locate automatically without overlapping other points in the EGP. EXPERT EXAMPLE: I love calling COVID Rona as if this is a person that has crashed our good time over the last year. wnpr.org

What a + NOUN PHRASE

Exclamative ‘what’ can precede the indefinite article and is, therefore, a predeterminer.  Here’s an example: What a surprise! Listen In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 38 in the category of CLAUSES/exclamations: ‘What a’ + noun phrase and ‘What a’ + noun phrase + clause However, in the English Vocabulary Profile, ‘what’ is listed at B1 …

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BE like

Point 19 in CLAUSES/comparatives is defined: ‘be’ + ‘like’ + noun or pronoun FOR EXAMPLE: How many people are like you? Are like me? A search in iWeb for: _VB like_II _P 1 ARE LIKE ME 7752 2 ‘RE LIKE ME 7377 3 ‘S LIKE YOU 4506 4 BE LIKE HIM 2401 5 BE LIKE YOU 2118 6 BE LIKE ME …

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You might

Point 92 in MODALITY: ‘might’ to make polite suggestions and give advice. We cannot automatically check a corpus for usage, but we can follow the EGP examples which both contain the pronoun ‘you’. An iWeb search for: You might * * * 1 YOU MIGHT BE ABLE TO 32578 You might be able to use a hammer …

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COULD (range)

A2 point 52 in MODALITY: ‘could’ with a limited range of verbs to make suggestions. A2 point 27 in MODALITY: negative form B1 point 78 in MODALITY: affirmative form of ‘could’ to talk about ability. B1 point 79 in MODALITY: ‘could’ with an increasing range of verbs to make suggestions. An iWeb search for: could …

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Can you believe?

Point 74 in MODALITY is defined: ‘can you believe’ to express surprise PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: Can you believe that my poor mother still did not know that she was dying? Mongol female level 4 grammar class. TLC SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: Can you believe that only in Niger there are one point three million people  who are in critical need of food and assistance due to corruption? female Sri Lanka B1 An iWeb search: 1 CAN YOU BELIEVE IT ? 2387 2 CAN YOU BELIEVE THAT ? …

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might not

Point 73 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘might’ negative form TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: I might not earn as much as others do. female India B1 An iWeb search for: might _XX _VVI 1 MIGHT NOT KNOW 12293 2 MIGHT NOT WANT 9556 3 MIGHT NOT WORK 8820 4 MIGHT NOT GET 8374 5 MIGHT NOT SEEM 7198 6 …

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I have to admit

Point 72 in MODALITY is defined: the fixed expression: ‘I have to admit’ for emphasis PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: When I want to talk about my weaknesses in writing in English, I have to admit the new words are my main problem. Arabic male, level 4 writing class.   TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: Therefore, I have to admit that it’s true with most old people, but with my parents,  I think that before I was born they hoped that they were going to have a girl. male China C1 *There are only a few …

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