QUESTIONS

  • Usually, a ‘question’ is a sentence that is used to get information.
  • Often, the verb is before the subject.

Do you know … (indirect question)

A2 point 20 in the category of PRESENT/simple: indirect questions with ‘Do you know’ + ‘how’, ‘where’, ‘why’, or ‘what’ An iWeb search: 1 DO YOU KNOW HOW TO 6056 2 DO YOU KNOW OF ANY 4276 3 DO YOU KNOW WHAT THE 3051 Do you know what the best way to acquire a new language is? PELIC Arabic male level 4 writing class. …

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Would you mind?

Here are the most common examples with explanations of ‘would you mind‘: Would you mind if I took your picture? Listen to the pronunciation   Point 83 at B1 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: ‘would’ to make polite requests, often in the fixed expression ‘would you mind’ ‘Would you mind’ is also B1 in the EVP and in the …

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6 ways to use ‘any + comparative’

‘Any’ can be used as an adverb to mean ‘at all’ or ‘in some degree’.  In the English Vocabulary Profile, ‘any’ is listed as ADVERB B1 used in questions and negatives to emphasize a comparative adjective or adverb Do you feel any better? I can’t walk any faster. Those trousers don’t look any different from the others. Houses in this area used to be a real bargain, but they’re not cheap any more. This radio isn’t any good – I ‘ll have to buy another. She couldn’t wait any longer. *’any more’ …

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WHAT IS IT YOU WANT? (relative clause question)

Let’s analyse questions that have relative clauses to give emphasis.  So usually, we would say something like: What do we want to ask?  What are we trying to find out here? You can see the normal auxiliary verbs ‘be’ and ‘do’ get removed and relative clauses are added in the EXPERT EXAMPLES: What is it that we want …

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BE | HAVE | DO (auxiliary verbs)

Here is another group of A2 English Grammar Profile points that overlap multiple categories.  Many of these could be all merged into one point. Point 3 in the category of QUESTIONS: yes/no AUXILIARY ‘BE’ + subject + the continuous Point 5 in QUESTIONS: MAIN VERB ‘BE’ + subject to form ‘yes/no’ question Point 40 in …

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modal verb (question)

Here are more overlapping points across the English Grammar Profile.  We have included their examples when needed too elaborate: A2 point 14 in CLAUSES: AFFIRMATIVE interrogative clauses (‘yes/no’ forms) with modal auxiliary verbs. Would you like to come with me? Will you go with me? Can I come tomorrow to collect it? (Can you|we…? is listed at A1) Shall we meet at 7.30 pm? (Here are …

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Can you believe?

Point 74 in MODALITY is defined: ‘can you believe’ to express surprise PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: Can you believe that my poor mother still did not know that she was dying? Mongol female level 4 grammar class. TLC SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: Can you believe that only in Niger there are one point three million people  who are in critical need of food and assistance due to corruption? female Sri Lanka B1 An iWeb search: 1 CAN YOU BELIEVE IT ? 2387 2 CAN YOU BELIEVE THAT ? …

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am|is|are + going + to-INFINITVE (future)

Here are two examples of ‘BE going to’ with A1 infinitives: It is going to take time. Listen to the pronunciation   Are you going to do anything about it? Listen to the pronunciation In the English Grammar Profile, in the category of FUTURE: B1 Point 31 is defined: ‘be going to’:  increasing range of verbs to make predictions. A2 point 4 is defined: …

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Could you possibly?

Point 101 in MODALITY/adverbs is defined: ‘could’ + subject + ‘possibly’ to make requests more polite *This is a very rare structure across corpora for a B1 structure.  This point overlaps the more common and general: B1 questions with adverbs: Could you possibly tell me how to fix this? An iWeb search for: . Could I|you possibly * 1 . COULD YOU POSSIBLY TELL …

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negative question

Negative questions usually show the speaker’s expectation that the response should be positive. Point 12 in the category of NEGATION: negative question forms in main clauses and question tags. This is such a general point that overlaps and clashes against so many other points in the English Grammar Profile.  For example: an uncontracted question for …

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past continuous question

Point 28 in the category of PAST: past continuous B1 question form An iWeb search for: was|were _P _VVG *not all these will lead to questions. 1 WERE YOU THINKING 2389 EXPERT EXAMPLE: What were you thinking? stuff.co.nz 2 WAS I GOING 2198 3 WERE THEY THINKING 1716 4 WERE YOU USING 1218 5 WERE YOU LOOKING 951 …

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present perfect continuous question

Point 31 in the category of PAST: present perfect continuous: QUESTIONS with a limited range of verbs. PELIC STUDENT: What have you been doing? Arabic male, Level 4 grammar class. An iWeb search for: have|has _P been _VVG 1 HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING 1224 2 HAVE YOU BEEN LOOKING 1218 3 HAVE YOU BEEN USING 914 4 HAVE YOU …

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word OR word ?

A2 Point 14 in the category of QUESTIONS is defined as: alternative questions with two words from the same class combined with ‘or’. *note that there is a b1 point for two clauses joined with ‘or’ in a question. A few searches on iWeb for: _NN or NN ? 1 PRODUCT OR SERVICE ? 1217 …

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present perfect simple negative question

Point 18 in the category of PAST is defined as: present perfect simple negative question *This point overlaps point 17 b1 negative questions. TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST: (discussing match-fixing in soccer) Haven’t you heard about the Italians? male Spain C2 An iWeb search for: VH _XX * _VVN ? 1 HAVE N’T YOU HEARD ? 164 2 HAVE N’T …

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