emphasis

6 ways to use ‘any + comparative’

‘Any’ can be used as an adverb to mean ‘at all’ or ‘in some degree’.  In the English Vocabulary Profile, ‘any’ is listed as ADVERB B1 used in questions and negatives to emphasize a comparative adjective or adverb Do you feel any better? I can’t walk any faster. Those trousers don’t look any different from the others. Houses in this area used to be a real bargain, but they’re not cheap any more. This radio isn’t any good – I ‘ll have to buy another. She couldn’t wait any longer. *’any more’ …

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IN THE LEAST

Here’s an expert example of negation + ‘in the least’: I’m not in the least bit religious. Listen to this sentence C2 Point 28 in the category of NEGATION is defined: ‘IN THE LEAST’ after a negative form for emphasis. A search in iWeb: 1 NOT SURPRISED IN THE LEAST 86 2 NOT BE IN THE LEAST 63 …

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‘be careful not to disturb them’ (adjective + ‘NOT TO’ + infinitive)

Here’s a student example in a speaking test of ‘BE + adjective + not + to-infinitive‘ to give emphasis: When you walk, you should be careful not to disturb them because they are all below you. TLC male Sri Lanka B1 *We can also write: You should be careful that you do not disturb them… Point 230 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: ‘BE’ + ADJECTIVE + ‘NOT’ …

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I have to admit

Point 72 in MODALITY is defined: the fixed expression: ‘I have to admit’ for emphasis PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: When I want to talk about my weaknesses in writing in English, I have to admit the new words are my main problem. Arabic male, level 4 writing class.   TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: Therefore, I have to admit that it’s true with most old people, but with my parents,  I think that before I was born they hoped that they were going to have a girl. male China C1 *There are only a few …

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SUCH + adjective + noun

Point 41 in the category of  NOUNS is defined as: noun phrases with ‘such a’ + adjective + singular noun and ‘such’ + adjective + plural noun, to give emphasis.   An iWeb search for: such a _JJ _NN 1 SUCH A LONG TIME 7187 2 SUCH A BIG DEAL 6247 3 SUCH A SHORT …

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(SUBJECT) CLEFT CONSTRUCTION WITH ‘it’

Point 116 in PRONOUNS is defined as: a cleft construction beginning with ‘it’ to emphasise the subject of the main clause. FOR EXAMPLE: After all, it’s individuals who are to blame here, right? *Seems like religious contexts use this structure. An iWeb search for: It _V _N who _V 1 IT IS GOD WHO IS 218 2 IT IS GOD WHO …

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DO + verb (imperative)

‘Do’ can be put before the imperative verb or auxiliary to make it less abrupt and more persuasive. Point 64 in the category of CLAUSES/imperatives is defined as: ‘DO’: base form of a main verb, for emphasis or in formal contexts A search in iWeb for: . Do _VVI 1 . DO NOTE 2681 2 …

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do + VERB

Point 79 in the category of CLAUSES is defined as: auxiliary verb ‘do’ in an affirmative declarative clause, for emphasis and affirmation. A search in iWeb for: do _VVI 1 DO KNOW 89665 2 DO GET 69098 3 DO THINK 68682 I do think that it is important for people who are being instructed in writing to know their stuff. yahoo.com 4 DO NEED 64647 5 DO LIKE 50742 …

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modal verb + modal adverb

B1 Point 57 in the category of modality/adverbs is defined as: modal verb + modal adverb to modify an assertion, either through hedging or emphasis. B1 point 81 in modality/adverbs is defined as: increasing range of adverbs, for emphasis However, when we check the EGP examples for point 57 which include: surely|certainly|probably, we soon see …

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really really

Point 38 in the category of ADVERBS/modifiers is defined as: DEGREE: ‘really really’ with verbs and adjectives for emphasis. 1 REALLY REALLY REALLY 2775 2 REALLY REALLY GOOD 2561 3 REALLY REALLY WANT 1526 4 REALLY REALLY LIKE 1090 5 REALLY REALLY BAD 1082 6 REALLY REALLY HARD 992 7 REALLY REALLY LOVE 757 8 …

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adverb + adjective (emphasis)

An adjective phrase can consist of an adverb + adjective.  In the following example: ‘obvious‘ is the head of the adjective phrase. It was painfully obvious. The adverb ‘painfully’ is used here to emphasize how annoying or unpleasant something was. C1 point 199 in the category of MODALITY/ MODIFYING ADJECTIVES adjectives with adverbs, often for …

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‘What you see is what you get.’ (CLEFT CLAUSE)

The English Grammar Profile C1 point 10 in the category of FOCUS is defined as: ‘What’ + noun or pronoun + verb phrase as subject + ‘be’, for focus. Note that Pearson lists this point: GSE 59 B2 clauses with ‘What …’ to emphasise the topic or main point. For example: What we need now is a good night’s sleep. What I said was that I don’t need your help. …

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adverb (hedging | emphasis)

Point 24 in MODALITY is defined as: adverbs in mid position or after main verb ‘be’, to modify an assertion, either through hedging or emphasis For example: I should probably start by looking at the bottom of the river. listen *side note, ‘at the bottom of the‘ is the 8th most frequent 5-word Ngram in English. iWeb 129,473 An iWeb …

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