quantity

quantifying determiner + possessive determiner + OF + noun phrase

A2 Point 29 in DETERMINERS is defined: quantifying determiners + possessive determiners + ‘of’ + noun. (noun phrases) *There are other A2 determiner grammar points that are less specific,  not requiring quantity or possession. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: In fact, some of my habits are changed by my mood. Arabic male level 3 writing class. An iWeb search for: _D of _AP _NN …

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quantity phrase + uncountable noun

The English Grammar Profile claims that there are over 1000 grammar points in its inventory.  However, there are numerous points that are overlapping.  This post shows 3 posts that overlap. B1 Point 34 in the category of NOUNS is defined as: uncountable nouns with an increasing range of determiners/quantity words and phrases including ‘much’, ‘a …

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some | any | each | a few + of + PRONOUN

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 49 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity  is defined as: increasing range of pronouns (‘some’, ‘a few’, ‘any’, ‘each’) with ‘of’ followed by an object pronoun. An iWeb search for: some|any|each of _P 1 SOME OF THEM 180790 TLC SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: There are many types of chocolates in this world, but unfortunately,  I‘m a fussy girl and I just like some of them. female, India, …

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a little | bits of | a bit of | a bit of a | a little bit of

‘BIT’ related to quantity is countable = a bit of … bits of … For example: By inserting those genes into yeast, we could produce little bits of that smell and be able to, maybe, smell a little bit of something that‘s lost forever. TED A2 in the English Vocabulary Profile: bit = a small amount or piece of something B1 in the Oxford Learner Dictionary: [countable] bit of something (especially British English) a small …

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adverb + determiner

Here are a few examples of determiners premodified by intensifiers. There are hardly any phone booths left in this city.   TLC male India B1 We have nearly all the big automobile companies. TLC male India, B1   It took me virtually no time at all. Listen to this expert example B1 point 48 in the category of DETERMINERS/quantity is defined as: modify determiners with adverbs. There is clashing information in the English Grammar Profile.  The example …

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most | enough | plenty of + NOUN

B1 Point 43 in the category of DETERMINERS is defined as: increasing range of quantifying determiners with both plural nouns and uncountable nouns (‘most’, ‘enough’, ‘plenty of’, ‘loads of’). *This overlaps another B1 point. PELIC WRITING CLASS EXAMPLES: Most students eat lunch and dinner in a cafeteria. Korean, Female, Level 3   In addition, the people who lived in Korea 100 years ago didn’t have enough transportation. Korean, Male, Level 3   *Note that …

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several | a few of

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 39 in the category of DETERMINERS is defined as: wide range of quantifying determiners with plural nouns (‘several’, ‘millions of’, ‘a few of’). *Note that if ‘millions of’ is used as hyperbole, then it is a C1 point. TLC, Speaking test examples: There are very few sports cars in Sri Lanka. We don’t …

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Many are the + NOUN + RELATIVE CLAUSE

In the English Grammar Profile, C2 point 117 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity is defined as: complex noun phrases using an inverted form ‘Many’ + ‘are’ + noun phrase, followed by a relative clause, as a focusing device. FOR EXAMPLE:   NBC News Covid is having a devastating impact on children — and the vaccine won’t …

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few | many | most | others (people)

At C1 in the English Grammar Profile, point 106 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity is defined as: ‘few’, ‘many’, ‘most’, ‘others’ to refer to people in formal written contexts, often reports or surveys. Here are some expert examples: Though in terms of grammar, it is relatively more straightforward than many languages around the world,  but when it comes to pronunciation, many find themselves stumbling. (more context)     Many were plagiarists, some were backstabbers, and there is even a grave robber among them. …

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EACH + THE OTHER

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 105 in the category of PRONOUNS/reciprocal is defined as: ‘each’ (+ noun or pronoun) as subject followed by ‘the other(s)’ a complement of a preposition, to refer to two related things. (pronouns: quantity) A search in TED corpus for: Each {n} * {in} the [other|others] Each attempt was substantially different from the other.   …

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too | very | so + many | few

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 102 in PRONOUNS/quantity is defined: MODIFIED: ‘few’ and ‘many’ with ‘very’, ‘too’, ‘so’ as intensifiers For example: If the chef answered YES to the number being less than 500, we‘d have four options, which is too many. TED It‘s been a crushing disappointment for me and for so many. TED And very few have it in them. LISTEN *’very few’ + noun is B2 A search in iWeb for: * * too|very|so many|few . 1 THERE ARE SO MANY. …

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