out

phrasal verb + clause ‘work out how you did it’

At C2 in the English Vocabulary Profile: work out = to understand something or to find the answer to something by thinking about it A search in NOW corpus for which ‘question words’ follow phrasal verbs: work out _*Q 1 WORK OUT HOW 12286 Just give us five minutes, Mr Poirot, and I‘m sure we‘ll be able to work out how you did it. listen 2 WORK OUT WHAT 11671 …

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that (pronoun)

In the English Grammar Profile, there are two similar points at A2 in the category of PRONOUN/demonstratives: Point 20 is defined as: ‘that’ as a pronoun to refer back to something which has already been mentioned Point 28: ‘that’ as a pronoun with singular reference For example: No, it‘s nowhere near that. listen That‘s why I brought you here. An iWeb search for: …

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JUST + preposition

Here are student examples of ‘just’ pre-modifying a prepositional phrase. I was a shy girl and sometimes I was just like a boy. TLC, speaking test, female China B1 Some successful people are well-known just in their country. PELIC, female Arabic level 4 writing class. In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 3 in the category of PREPOSITIONS is defined: ‘JUST’ + to modify prepositions. An iWeb search for: just_R _II 1 JUST LIKE …

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‘be careful not to disturb them’ (adjective + ‘NOT TO’ + infinitive)

Here’s a student example in a speaking test of ‘BE + adjective + not + to-infinitive‘ to give emphasis: When you walk, you should be careful not to disturb them because they are all below you. TLC male Sri Lanka B1 *We can also write: You should be careful that you do not disturb them… Point 230 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: ‘BE’ + ADJECTIVE + ‘NOT’ …

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wouldn’t

Point 15 in MODALITY is defined: would negative forms *It is incredibly hard to find an example that is not already a part of another grammar point. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: I’m convinced that it wouldn’t take much time to change the system  and think about how to add new things  in order to help people to start the workday in a more enjoyable manner. French male level 4 writing class. An iWeb search for: would _XX * * * 1 WOULD NOT BE …

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imperative

Here are two A2 English Grammar Profile points in different categories that cover imperatives. Point 39 in the category of CLAUSES is defined: affirmative imperative with the base form of a main verb Point 7 in NEGATION:  negative imperatives of main verbs with ‘don’t’ + main verb. However, ‘let me/us’ is listed at B2 in …

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Let’s + VERB

In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 29, in the category of CLAUSES is defined: ‘let’s’ + base form of a main verb, for first person plural imperatives to make a suggestion PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: Let’s discuss each change and see some examples of them. Arabic male level 5 writing class. An iWeb search for: Let_VM21 * * * * 1 LET ‘S TAKE A …

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look forward to

Point 13 in the category of VERBS/phrasal-prepositional is defined as: ‘look forward to’ as a fixed expression followed by an ‘-ing’ form or noun phrase, usually at the end of correspondence. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: I am looking forward to getting your letter. Japanese female, level 3 writing class. A search in iWeb for: LOOK forward to * * 1 LOOK …

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passive + BY + noun phrase

In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 2 in the category of PASSIVES : ‘BY’ to add information about something already known. B1 point 12 in the category of PASSIVES is defined as: passive with ‘by’ to give focus. All the A2 examples use the pronoun IT  + is|was + past participle  + by The one …

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which one

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 44 in the category of PRONOUNS/substitution is defined as: ‘one’ after ‘which’ in indirect questions to refer to one of two or more options. For example: If I were to show you these two urban scenes, and I were to ask you which one is more beautiful, which one would you say? TED *not all the examples are ‘indirect questions’ in the EGP examples. A search in iWeb for: which one …

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himself | herself | myself | yourself

There are three very similar B1 points in the English Grammar Profile in the Category of PRONOUNS/singular reflexive Point 45 is defined as: ‘myself’, ‘yourself’, ‘himself’ and ‘herself’ after prepositions where the object of the preposition is the same as the subject of the verb. Point 65 is: ‘myself’, ‘yourself’, ‘himself’ and ‘herself’ for emphasis. …

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OR questions

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 27 in the category of QUESTIONS is defined as: alternative questions with two clauses combined with ‘or’. A search in iWeb for or _V _P * ? 1 OR AM I WRONG? 621 2 OR DOES IT MATTER? 287   Villanovan Do you view all these changes in entertainment as good or bad, or does it matter at all? *Note …

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phrasal verbs

There are 9 similar points across the English Grammar Profile in the category of VERBS covering phrasal verbs across the levels.  And the differentiation between the levels becomes difficult to interpret since it is more about the vocabulary.  For this reason, the English Vocabulary Profile is probably more beneficial even though the logic of what …

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SO MUCH | A LOT (end position)

In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 18 in the category of Adverbs is defined: degree adverbs in end position. For example: You bother me a lot. listen An iWeb search for: _VV * so much . 1 THANK YOU SO MUCH. 12598 2 LOVE IT SO MUCH. 1600 3 LOVE YOU SO MUCH. 752 4 LOVE THEM …

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OF (complex phrases)

The third most frequent word in the English language is used in a lot of different ways. ‘OF‘ is most often in a prepositional phrase, but it is also used in many other types of phrases.  Below we list the ranked frequency found in the iWeb corpus. 1 OF (IO) 328813259 2 OF (II22) 11680309 …

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have got to | have to | don’t have to

Here are two student examples of using semi-modal ‘have to’ to express whether something is required or necessary. Another thing is you have to make sure that you have included signal words to help the reader. PELIC Arabic female level 3 writing class.   I mean if someone wears something, you don’t have to wear that because she or he wears it. TLC male Spain B1 speaking test. *Note, the reduced clause ‘you don’t have to‘ is the 9th most …

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‘It is better to give than to receive.’ (comparative non-finite clause)

Here are some examples of a wide range of comparative non-finite clauses: The numbers are higher than expected. (using a past participle/adjective) To be kind is more important than to be right. (using TO infinitive) It may now be cheaper to buy than to rent. (using TO infinitive) B2 Point 103 in the category of CLAUSES & comparatives is defined …

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