set

Verb + question word + to infinitive ‘learn how to use’

The WH-adverbs: such as ‘how’, ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘why’ are often called ‘question words’ because they typically introduce interrogative sentences.  However, in this post, we look at the way they introduce other clauses: A search in iWeb for: _V _*Q _TO _VVI   1 LEARN HOW TO USE 24468 Learn how to use it. (EVP A2 how = …

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imperative

Here are two A2 English Grammar Profile points in different categories that cover imperatives. Point 39 in the category of CLAUSES is defined: affirmative imperative with the base form of a main verb Point 7 in NEGATION:  negative imperatives of main verbs with ‘don’t’ + main verb. For example: Now, wait a minute. Sit down, Zero. listen …

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TO HAVE TO

Point 117 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘have to’ as an infinitive form *This will overlap sometimes with B2 adjectives followed by an infinitive. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: A child is very expensive, this causes parents to have to work more, which can lead to frustration and anger. Taiwanese female, level 4 writing class. An iWeb search for: * _TO have _TO _VVI 1 GOING TO HAVE TO GET 4269 …

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ordering past events

Point 35 in the category of PAST is defined: past simple to order sequences of events in the past, in the context of narratives. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: I looked at the sheet and thought about it and then I continued following my sheet. When I noticed that I should have arrived, I called my brother and he told me that I had the wrong directions. Arabic male, level 5 grammar class. Two of the EGP examples use ‘and then’ while one only uses ‘and’ to connect past …

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VERB + myself | yourself | himself | itself | herself

B1 Point 55 in the category of PRONOUNS is defined as: increasing range of singular reflexive pronouns with an increasing range of verbs to refer to actions where the subject and object of the verb are the same. A2 Point 12: range of singular reflexive pronouns (‘myself’, ‘yourself’) with a limited range of verbs (‘enjoy’, …

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yours (subject)

Point 57 in the category of PRONOUNS/possessive is defined as: yours with singular reference in subject position. FOR EXAMPLE: The world needs every voice and perspective, and yours is included. A search in iWeb for: yours _VV 1 YOURS LOOKS 1874 2 YOURS LOOK 1099 3 YOURS SOUNDS 428 4 YOURS SEEMS 380 5 YOURS TURNED 346 6 YOURS STAND 340 7 YOURS CAME …

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THE OTHER + noun

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 47 in the category of DETERMINERS/articles is defined as: ‘THE OTHER’ with a singular noun to refer to the second or the opposite of two things, and with a plural noun to refer to one of a set of things. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: After a while, I thought that it was better to move to the other house. Korean, Female, Level …

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get + PAST PARTICIPLE

Point 5 in the category of passives is defined as: a range of forms of ‘get’ + past participles. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: I would like to get rid of my bad habits. Korean, Female, Level 3, Writing Class. A search in iWeb for: GET _VVN 1 GET RID 313567 2 GET STARTED 233345 3 GET PAID 68050 4 GET CAUGHT 54284 …

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HELP + object + infinitive

The verb ‘help’ can be followed by a bare infinitive clause or a to-infinitive clause.  In the following examples ‘understand’ is a bare infinitive (without ‘to’),  ‘to remember’ is the to-infinitive.  The pronouns ‘us’ and ‘you’ are objects. Help us understand your father‘s work. listen These might help you to remember the truth. listen B1 point 40 in the category of VERBS/patterns: ‘help’ + object + infinitive …

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CAN + limited range of adverbs

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 120 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: ‘can’ with a limited range of adverbs (including ‘also’, ‘always’, ‘even’, ‘just’, ‘only’, ‘really’, ‘still’) in the normal mid position after the modal verb. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: Some old people can only sit on the wheelchair. Chinese female level 3 writing class. A search on iWeb for: can_VM …

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present simple passive affirmative (range)

Here are two grammar points from the English Grammar Profile. A2 point 3 in the category of PASSIVES: present simple passive affirmative with a singular subject. B1 point 13 in the category of PASSIVES is defined as: PRESENT SIMPLE, AFFIRMATIVE with a range of pronoun and noun subjects. For example: The proposed mission is called the Uranus Orbiter and Probe and would shed some light on the mostly unexplored ice giant. …

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past perfect simple affirmative

Here are examples of past perfect simple affirmative: Instead, the Ryans had decided to take a more old-fashioned route. context I must say I‘d hoped for better. listen In the English Grammar Profile, B1 points 34 in the category of PAST are defined as: past perfect simple: a time before another time in the past. and B1 point 38 in the category of PAST is defined as: past perfect …

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BE set to INFINITIVE

‘set to’ just means: be ready or prepared to do something.   C1 English Grammar Profile point 209 in MODALITY  is defined as: ‘BE SET TO’ – strong assertion about the future, especially in institutional contexts An iWeb search for: _VB set to _VVI 1 IS SET TO TAKE 4027 2 IS SET TO BEGIN 3858 3 IS SET TO OPEN …

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past simple affirmative (range)

Here’s an example of past simple with academic collocation: I added some information now. (listen to this sentence) There are 3 entries in the English Grammar Profile for past simple affirmative range.  This point is best covered by the English Vocabulary Profile since it offers much more detail about vocabulary. A1 point 1 is defined: past simple affirmative form …

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