must

English lexical bundles and their most frequent equivalent forms in French

In this post, we put common lexical bundles that French EFL students use in their writing, through our GRAMMAR PROFILER.  Magali Paquot wrote a paper about Lexical bundles.  Here are the significant forms found in the ICLE – FR: Here are our expert examples: You‘ll be tempted to tear it off. listen They may never be considered as such by religion, but they are just as important as the ones in your textbooks. listen Kaleb‘s art can be viewed as deeply rooted in the pop minimalism of Aureur or Baer. …

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must see

Usually, must is a modal verb. You must see this movie. You must see the difference. (see can mean understand/notice) However, ‘must’ can be a noun. It’s a must. = This is a thing that you must do. There are new combinations: As an adjective: It’s a must-see movie. =  It’s a movie that you …

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MUST (ellipsis of following verb)

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 71 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘must’ with the following verb ellipted where the previous main verb is understood *an ellipted subject is also B1. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: [The] coach must have a capability to solve problems of teammates, just as business managers must. Korean Female level 5 writing class   EXPERT EXAMPLE: We can do this because we must. We did an iWeb search …

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MUST (ellipted subject)

B1 Point 116 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ellipted ‘must’ without a subject *Note the general B2 subject pronoun ellipsis A search in iWeb for: . must _VVI *also note that this grammar is either non-existent in PELIC student writing or very difficult to locate in TLC or on Google.  The example come …

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The thing + CLAUSE COMPLEMENT (front position)

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 40 in the category of NOUNS is defined as: the noun phrase ‘The thing’ in front position, with a clause complement, to give focus to something. *This grammar point overlaps others at B1 and there is a slight overlap with B2. A search in iWeb corpus for: . The …

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BOTH | A FEW

Point 61 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity is defined as: ‘BOTH’, ‘A FEW’, ‘ANOTHER’ as subject and object pronouns. *We have covered the use of ‘another’ here. A search in iWeb corpus for: . both _V 1 . BOTH ARE 48684 2 . BOTH HAVE 15241 3 . BOTH WERE 15188 4 . BOTH WILL …

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HOW + adjective + clause (exclamation)

An ‘exclamation’ means: a remark expressing surprise or strong emotion. How wonderful that you came. How nice to see you! In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 48 in CLAUSES phrases/exclamations is defined as: ‘HOW’ + ADJECTIVE + CLAUSE A search in iWeb for: . How _JJ _P _V 1 . HOW IMPORTANT IT IS 103 2 . HOW LUCKY WE ARE 97 …

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modal verb + modal adverb

B1 Point 57 in the English Grammar Profile, in the category of MODALITY/adverbs, is defined as: modal verb + modal adverb to modify an assertion, either through hedging or emphasis. B1 point 81 in modality/adverbs is defined as: increasing range of adverbs, for emphasis However, when we check the EGP examples for point 57 which …

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if + PAST PERFECT + MODAL VERBS

C1 point 112 in CLAUSES/conditional is defined as: Conditional subordinate clauses with ‘if’ + the past perfect simple and modal verb + ‘have’ + ‘-ed’ in the main clause, to talk about imagined situations in the past, often with regret. *Note the same definition with ‘would‘ is listed at B1!  Basically, this means that for …

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I must admit

In the English Grammar Profile, B2 point 165 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: the fixed expression ‘I must admit’ or ‘you must admit’ to express concession. The verb ‘admit’ is B1 in the English Vocabulary Profile with the meaning:  agree that something is true, especially unwillingly A search for collocates of ‘must admit’ …

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MUST questions

In the English Grammar Profile, there are two points in the category of Modality at B2 which are practically the same. Point 147 is: ‘must’ the question form. Point 161 is: ‘must’ to ask about obligation and necessity. For example: I began to wonder, why must it be so binary? TED What sort of talents must we be sure to defend? TED An iWeb cluster search for must …

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MUST HAVE + past participle

In the English Grammar Profile, there are essentially the same two points in the category of Modality at B2 for the same form. Point 144 is defined as: DEDUCTIONS AND CONCLUSIONS: perfect form of ‘must’ to make deductions about the past. and point 166: PAST AFFIRMATIVE must have’ + ‘-ed’. For example: He had come such a long way, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could …

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