get

GET + comparative

In the English Vocabulary Profile, listed at B1 is: get worse = to become more ill, unpleasant, difficult, severe, etc. than before For example: But if this thing gets worse, we must close. listen There is no English Grammar Profile point that specifically focuses on GET + comparative A search in NOW corpus for: GET _JJR 1 GET WORSE 42282 2 GETTING …

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Don’t get me wrong

In the English Vocabulary Profile, Don’t get me wrong INFORMAL C2 used when you do not want someone to think that you do not like someone or something For example: Now, don’t get me wrong, I am incredibly grateful to be alive,  and I am painfully aware that this struggle is a privilege that many don’t get to experience. fsc.org.au   Collocates of ‘Don’t get me wrong‘ in the MOVIE corpus: 1 N’T 917 2 LOVE 72 Don’t get me wrong, I love it. listen …

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CAN | WILL (affirmative declarative clause)

A1 point 1 in the category of CLAUSES is defined: affirmative declarative clauses with modal verbs. The English Grammar Profile examples include: ‘can’ and ‘will’.  Future simple modality is also covered here. Here are STUDENT EXAMPLES: A lot of farmers can read and write, but they didn’t complete high school. PELIC Chinese female level 3 writing class.   I will go to New York on Thanksgiving day. Korean female level …

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late | soon (end position)

In the English Grammar Profile, A1 point 15 in the category of ADVERBS is defined: time adverbs in the usual end position. The EGP only lists ‘soon’ and ‘late’ as examples for this point.  However, this point overlaps ‘adjuncts’ in time expressions at A1: … yesterday. … tomorrow. A2 increasing range of adverbs: … later. …

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really | always | sometimes + VERB

The first point in the English Grammar Profile! A1 point 1 in the category of ADVERBS is defined: adverbs of degree and time to modify verbs. An iWeb search for: really|always|sometimes _VV   1 REALLY WANT 213278 I really want a brother.   Listen to the pronunciation 2 REALLY LIKE 181415 3 REALLY NEED 161580 4 REALLY KNOW …

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get + PAST PARTICIPLE

Point 5 in the category of passives is defined as: a range of forms of ‘get’ + past participles. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: I would like to get rid of my bad habits. Korean, Female, Level 3, Writing Class. A search in iWeb for: GET _VVN 1 GET RID 313567 2 GET STARTED 233345 3 GET PAID 68050 4 GET CAUGHT 54284 …

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‘GET’ + OBJECT + PAST PARTICPLE

C1 English Grammar Profile point 35 in PASSIVES is defined as: ‘get’ + object + ‘-ed’ to talk about causing or instructing something to happen or to be done by somebody else, often informally For example: Now, as it happens, I do have some connections in the drilling business who might help get us started. listen A search in iWeb for: GET _N _VVN *not all the following match our grammar …

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GET + OBJECT + VERBing

Point 33 in PASSIVES is defined as: ‘GET’ + OBJECT + ‘-ING’ to talk about causing someone or something to do something. For example: And working with Craig got me thinking. Not all of the following in iWeb match our grammar: GET * _VVG 1 GOT ME THINKING 14965 2 GET IT WORKING 7858 3 …

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comparative AND comparative

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 47 in Adjectives is defined as: ‘and’ to repeat a comparative adjective to indicate change over time, usually after ‘become’ or ‘get’ However, the English Vocabulary Profile lists ‘worse and worse‘ at B2  used to emphasize how unpleasant, difficult, severe, etc. something is becoming A search in iWeb corpus: _V …

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EVEN + comparative adjective

In this post, we explore ‘even + comparative’ which is used to emphasize qualities. In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 40 in ADJECTIVES is defined as: ‘even’ to modify and intensify comparative adjectives used predicatively after a verb, usually ‘be’ and ‘get’. We did an iWeb search for even _JJ and highlighted the A2 comparative adjectives: …

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VERB + PARTICLE + PREPOSITION + OBJECT ‘get back to you’

B2 English Grammar Profile point 49 in VERBS/phrasal-prepositional is defined as: increasing range of verb + particle + preposition + noun or pronoun   An iWeb search for: _VV _RP _I _P 1 GET BACK TO YOU 19937 EVP C1 They can learn more things from this experience and they might get back to their school with more self-confidence. PELIC STUDENT Korean, Female, level 4, writing class 2 …

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GET + object + TO infinitive “get them to come”

Let’s analyse and then listen to the grammar structure: ‘get someone or something to do something’ by looking at real expert examples: I can’t get these parents to come. I’ll get them to come. Listen to these examples. The same meaning of ‘get + object + infinitive‘ can be written in other ways: I can’t make them come. I can’t change their …

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BY phrases

In this post we explore the ways ‘by’ is tagged in large corpora such as iWeb and NOW. 1 BY (II) is clearly most commonly found to be a simple preposition. 2 BY (II31) (complex prepositional phrase) 1 BY WAY OF 81460 C1 Second, the other sentences which make up the body of the paragraph should support the topic sentence  by way of explaining or defining it. PELIC STUDENT: Korean female, level 5 writing …

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GET + reflexive pronoun + past participle

You should get yourself checked by your doctor. This is an example of the B2 grammar point. point 18 in PASSIVES is defined as: reflexive pronoun with the ‘get’-passive [get] _ppx _vvn 1 GET YOURSELF CHECKED 313   The Indian Express Don’t miss your dental check-ups, here’s why If you get yourself checked at a …

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really ought to

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 180 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: ‘ought to’ with ‘really’ to add emphasis. A search on iWeb for clusters with lexical verbs: 1 REALLY OUGHT TO KNOW 254 2 REALLY OUGHT TO GET 136 3 REALLY OUGHT TO GO 76 4 REALLY OUGHT TO CONSIDER …

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