P

time adjuncts

A1 point 1 in the category of NOUNS/phrases: AS ADJUNCTS in some time expressions. The English Grammar Profile examples include: …you tomorrow morning. …her tomorrow …interview today. …you again next week. A search in iWeb for: _P _MD _NNT 1 IT LAST YEAR 6046 Randy did it last year. listen 2 IT LAST NIGHT 4620 3 IT NEXT TIME …

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‘AS’ + pronoun + ‘USED’ + to-infinitive

In the English Grammar Profile, C2 point 236 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘as’ + pronoun + ‘used to’ to add background to a narrative, often to highlight something unusual *Note this is not the “as + adjective + as” structure. Student example in a speaking test: I don’t think that they pay enough attention towards the national customs as they used to do those days. …

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BE + like + NOUN PHRASE

In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 19 in the category of CLAUSES/comparatives is defined: ‘be’ + ‘like’ + noun or pronoun FOR EXAMPLE: How many people are like you? Are like me? A search in iWeb for: _VB like_II _P 1 ARE LIKE ME 7752 2 ‘RE LIKE ME 7377 3 ‘S LIKE YOU 4506 4 BE LIKE HIM 2401 …

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Could I?

Point 56 in the category of MODALITY: ‘could I’ to seek permission. An iWeb search for: . Could I * * *We have removed anything that is obviously not asking permission but still many entries contain questions related to possibility. 2 . COULD I GET A 93    MMA Conor McGregor asks for Jorge Masvidal …

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present perfect simple (range)

There is no listing in the English Grammar Profile for a ‘wide‘ range of main verbs with present perfect simple.  So, here’s an expert example of present perfect simple using academic collocation: In the course of my professional life, I have acquired knowledge and manual skill.    (linotype.com) Here are some general range points in the English Grammar Profile in the category of …

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some | any | each | a few + of + PRONOUN

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 49 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity  is defined as: increasing range of pronouns (‘some’, ‘a few’, ‘any’, ‘each’) with ‘of’ followed by an object pronoun. An iWeb search for: some|any|each of _P 1 SOME OF THEM 180790 TLC SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: There are many types of chocolates in this world, but unfortunately,  I‘m a fussy girl and I just like some of them. female, India, …

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as soon as (future)

This is another clashing point.  Although ‘as soon as’ is listed at B1 future, it is also listed in B2 conjunctions. FOR EXAMPLE: It will end as soon as Hedge finds his target. A search in iWeb for: _VVI as soon as _P 1 KNOW AS SOON AS WE 441 2 KNOW AS SOON AS YOU 362 3 KNOW AS SOON …

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HELP + object + infinitive

The verb ‘help’ can be followed by a bare infinitive clause or a to-infinitive clause.  In the following examples ‘understand’ is a bare infinitive (without ‘to’),  ‘to remember’ is the to-infinitive.  The pronouns ‘us’ and ‘you’ are objects. Help us understand your father‘s work. listen These might help you to remember the truth. listen B1 point 40 in the category of VERBS/patterns: ‘help’ + object + infinitive …

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EACH + THE OTHER

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 105 in the category of PRONOUNS/reciprocal is defined as: ‘each’ (+ noun or pronoun) as subject followed by ‘the other(s)’ a complement of a preposition, to refer to two related things. (pronouns: quantity) A search in TED corpus for: Each {n} * {in} the [other|others] Each attempt was substantially different from the other.   …

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