noticed

You might

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 92 in MODALITY is defined as: ‘might’ to make polite suggestions and give advice. We cannot automatically check a corpus for usage, but we can follow the EGP examples which both contain the pronoun ‘you’. An iWeb search for: You might * * * 1 YOU MIGHT BE …

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present perfect simple negative (YET)

Here’s a student example of ‘present perfect simple negative‘: Today I can play very well with someone, even when I haven’t played for a long time. Portuguese female level 3 writing. A2 point 5 in the category of  NEGATION/AUXILIARY VERBS is defined: negative statements of main verbs in the present continuous and present perfect with ‘be’ and ‘have’ + ‘not/n’t’. A2 point 13 in the category of PAST is defined: …

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present perfect simple (range)

There is no listing in the English Grammar Profile for a ‘wide‘ range of main verbs with present perfect simple.  So, here’s an expert example of present perfect simple using academic collocation: In the course of my professional life, I have acquired knowledge and manual skill.    (linotype.com) Here are some general range points in the English Grammar Profile in the category of …

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present perfect simple negative question

Point 18 in the category of PAST is defined as: present perfect simple negative question *This point overlaps point 17 b1 negative questions. TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST: (discussing match-fixing in soccer) Haven’t you heard about the Italians? male Spain C2 An iWeb search for: VH _XX * _VVN ? 1 HAVE N’T YOU HEARD ? 164 2 HAVE N’T …

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had not + PAST PARTICIPLE

Point 24 in the category of PAST perfect simple: negative forms. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: At that time, I had not found my job and I had a lot of free time. Chinese male, level 3 writing class. A search on iWeb for: _VHD _XX _VVN 1 HAD N’T SEEN 10519 2 HAD NOT SEEN 8370 3 HAD N’T HEARD 6433 4 HAD N’T THOUGHT 5405 5 …

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The thing + CLAUSE COMPLEMENT (front position)

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 40 in the category of NOUNS is defined as: the noun phrase ‘The thing’ in front position, with a clause complement, to give focus to something. *This grammar point overlaps others at B1 and there is a slight overlap with B2. A search in iWeb corpus for: . The …

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as you might (SHARED KNOWLEDGE)

Point 90 in MODALITY is defined as: ‘might’ in phrases, such as ‘as you might know’, ‘have already heard’, to focus the reader on shared knowledge. 1 AS YOU MIGHT EXPECT , 6532 2 AS YOU MIGHT THINK . 3862 3 AS YOU MIGHT IMAGINE , 3657 4 AS YOU MIGHT HAVE GUESSED 2253 As …

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DIRECT SPEECH (initial or end position)

The following two B1 points are only different in the order. Point 4 in REPORTED SPEECH is defined as: DIRECT SPEECH, REPORTING CLAUSE, INITIAL POSITION: report speech and thought directly, using the reporting verb before the reporting clause Point 9 is END POSITION: report speech and thought directly using the reporting verb after the reporting …

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might | may not + have + PAST PARTICIPLE (past possibility)

Here are the most common verbs found in this grammar structure with examples:

You MIGHT NOT HAVE KNOWN about the party.
She MIGHT NOT HAVE THOUGHT you were serious.
They MIGHT NOT HAVE HEARD that you were coming.

The negative past modal meaning expressed here is of possibility.

present perfect simple questions + increasing range of verbs

In the English Grammar Profile, B2 point 51 in the category of PAST and present perfect simple is defined as: question form with an increasing range of verbs. For example: How much sleep have they actually lost? TED Looking for variable-length questions on iWeb is always a hard task.  Here is only one set pattern that finds some.  Note that we …

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GET + reflexive pronoun + past participle

You should get yourself checked by your doctor. This is an example of the B2 grammar point. point 18 in PASSIVES is defined as: reflexive pronoun with the ‘get’-passive [get] _ppx _vvn 1 GET YOURSELF CHECKED 313   The Indian Express Don’t miss your dental check-ups, here’s why If you get yourself checked at a …

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ought to have + PAST PARTICIPLE

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 202 in MODALITY is defined as: PAST AFFIRMATIVE ‘ought to have’ + ‘-ed’ to refer to desired states of affairs in the past. This structure can express regret or show that something did not happen or was not the case in the past. For example: l ought to have stayed in Kentucky where l belong. listen In …

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will have + PAST PARTICIPLE (future perfect)

There are 5 formally related grammar points in the English Grammar Profile in the category of FUTURE/perfect simple with ‘will.’  Many of them overlap and at C1 they are very rare and hard to find in corpora.  An example from the iWeb corpus of the future perfect form used for a polite assumption about the …

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