mind

Would you mind?

Here are the most common examples with explanations of ‘would you mind‘: Would you mind if I took your picture? *notice the past form ‘took’ to be polite. Listen to the pronunciation   In the English Grammar Profile, point 83 at B1 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: ‘would’ to make polite requests, often in the fixed expression ‘would you …

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imperative

Here are two A2 English Grammar Profile points in different categories that cover imperatives. Point 39 in the category of CLAUSES is defined: affirmative imperative with the base form of a main verb Point 7 in NEGATION:  negative imperatives of main verbs with ‘don’t’ + main verb. However, ‘let me/us’ is listed at B2 in …

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manner adverbs

Point 28 in ADVERBS is defined: limited range of manner adverbs and adverb phrases to modify how something happens. PELIC STUDENTS: The most important thing is to practise because with no practise, you will forget quickly. Arabic male level 3 writing class.   Yesterday I woke up early because I had a test. Arabic male level 2 writing class. *’early’ is more of a time adverb. A search in iWeb for: _VV *ly_RR . 1 …

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superlative + noun+ IN

Point 11 in the category of ADJECTIVES: prepositional phrases with ‘in’ + singular name of a place after a superlative adjective. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: I am not shy with girls, I always tell my brother don’t be shy with them,  they are the best creatures in the world. Arabic male level 2 writing class. A search in iWeb for: _JJT _NN in _N 1 BEST THINGS IN LIFE 1698 2 BEST …

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modal verb (question)

Here are more overlapping points across the English Grammar Profile.  We have included their examples when needed too elaborate: A2 point 14 in CLAUSES: AFFIRMATIVE interrogative clauses (‘yes/no’ forms) with modal auxiliary verbs. Would you like to come with me? Will you go with me? Can I come tomorrow to collect it? (Can you|we…? is listed at A1) Shall we meet at 7.30 pm? (Here are …

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might not + bare infinitive

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 73 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘might’ negative form ‘Might not + infinitive‘ means that there is a chance someone or something won’t do or happen. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: Even though she has a very good relationship with children, she might not be good at raising them. Chinese Female level 3 reading class   TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: I might not earn as much as others do. …

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apposition

Point 36 in the category of  NOUNS is defined as: two noun phrases together (in apposition) to refer to the same person or thing, usually separated by commas.   EXPERT EXAMPLES: With the lack of competition due to COVID restrictions, Moraga’s Campolindo High School senior, Daniel Zabronsky, has been channelling his energy into teaching English to students in Colombia, South America.   Zabronsky’s eighth-grade sister, Isabel, did her share of “tutoring” by speaking in English during visits to Colombia. …

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noun + OF + MINE | YOURS

Here is another example of overlapping grammar points in the English Grammar Profile. B1 Point 37 in the category of NOUNS/phrases is defined as: NOUN + ‘OF’ + POSSESSIVE PRONOUN Which overlaps the more specific B1 point 47 in the category of PRONOUNS: possessive pronoun ‘yours’ after noun + ‘of’. It would be very beneficial …

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If + PRESENT SIMPLE + MODAL CLAUSE

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 74 in the category of CLAUSES/conditional is defined as: PRESENT SIMPLE ‘IF’ CLAUSE + MODAL, FUTURE, POSSIBLE OUTCOME: introduce a possible future condition, with modal verbs in the main clause, to talk about a possible result. A search in TED corpus for expert examples: If you‘ve got a couple of final words you want to share, that would be great. listen So if you look that up, you can hear more of those tunes. listen PELIC …

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DO + verb (imperative)

‘Do’ can be put before the imperative verb or auxiliary to make it less abrupt and more persuasive. In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 64 in the category of CLAUSES/imperatives is defined as: ‘DO’: base form of a main verb, for emphasis or in formal contexts A search in iWeb for: . Do _VVI …

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past simple negative

A2 English Grammar Profile point 10 in the category of NEGATION is defined as: negative statements of main verbs in the past simple with ‘didn’t’ + main verb A search in iWeb for: did n’t _VVI 1 DID N’T KNOW 189531 2 DID N’T WANT 163517 3 DID N’T GET 103113 4 DID N’T THINK …

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verb + preposition + object

In the English Grammar Profile, A1 point 4 in VERBS/prepositional is defined as: limited range of prepositional verbs followed by noun or pronoun objects. The examples in the EGP: listen_VV0 to_II music_NN1 look_VVI after_II her_PPHO1 look_VVI for_IF mushrooms_NN2 Point 31 at B1 is the same as above except: “increasing range”. James, do you think you can cope with the pressure? listen We wish we wouldn’t have to deal with these things. twincities.com …

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SO MUCH | A LOT (end position)

In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 18 in the category of Adverbs is defined: degree adverbs in end position. For example: You bother me a lot. listen An iWeb search for: _VV * so much . 1 THANK YOU SO MUCH. 12598 2 LOVE IT SO MUCH. 1600 3 LOVE YOU SO MUCH. 752 4 LOVE THEM …

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