all

ALL ABOUT + noun phrase

“ALL ABOUT” is used to describe the purpose or an aspect of something. (OXFORD B1)
For example ‘Some days, we forgot all about getting to Italy.’ ‘It’s all about the money.’
2 ALL ABOUT MAKING 4081
3 ALL ABOUT WINNING 1859
4 ALL ABOUT GIVING 1851
5 ALL ABOUT CREATING 1801
6 ALL ABOUT FINDING 1480
7 ALL ABOUT TAKING 1397
8 ALL ABOUT TRYING 1340
9 ALL ABOUT PUTTING 1279
10 ALL ABOUT KEEPING 1279

all the time

The phrase ‘all the time‘ is listed at A2 in the English Vocabulary Profile with the meaning ‘continuously‘. Rachel talks about you all the time. I ask them all the time, but they said I still can’t come home. Why do you have to talk to me like that all the time for? listen A search in COCA for collocates: 1 HAPPENS 541 This happens all the time. TED 2 WATCHING 63 3 SPENT 56 4 ANGRY 53 5 …

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ALL + clause (the only thing) ‘all I can say is…’

‘All’ with the meaning ‘the only thing’ is listed at B1 in the English Vocabulary Profile. For example: All I can say is I‘m sorry. listen   All it does is tire your mind and stops you thinking for yourself. listen   That‘s all I can suggest. Stranger Than Fiction An iWeb search for: All * _VM _VVI _VB 1 ALL I CAN SAY IS 19460 2 ALL WE CAN SAY IS 1135 3 ALL …

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determiner + noun phrase (increasing range)

Here’s a student example of a determiner + uncountable noun: My teacher told me “enjoy the music and you will dance naturally.” PELIC Taiwanese female level 3 writing class A2 point 18 in the category of  NOUNS is defined: form simple noun phrases by pre-modifying nouns with an increasing range of determiners. A2 point 24 in the category of NOUNS: form …

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adverb + determiner

Here are a few examples of determiners premodified by intensifiers. There are hardly any phone booths left in this city.   TLC male India B1 We have nearly all the big automobile companies. TLC male India, B1   It took me virtually no time at all. Listen to this expert example B1 point 48 in the category of DETERMINERS/quantity is defined as: modify determiners with adverbs. There is clashing information in the English Grammar Profile.  The example …

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Not + everyone | everything | every | all

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 26 in the category of NEGATION is defined as: ‘not’ with indefinite pronouns ‘everyone’ and ‘everything’ and determiners ‘every’, ‘all’ For example: Not everyone is always looking for easier. (more context) Besides, not everyone needs a decent education. (more context) PELIC student example: level 3 Portuguese female: Finally, not all things you think to do in this world can turn out in the way you try to do them. …

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all | one | some + OF + these | those | this | that

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 52 in the category of PRONOUNS / demonstratives is defined as: quantifying determiners + ‘of’ with demonstrative pronouns An iWeb search for: _DD of _DD 1 SOME OF THESE 258542  STUDENT example: The hospitality in Saudi Arabia is very different between provinces.  Some of these have traditional hospitality, but others have modern hospitality. PELIC Arabic male level 3 …

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all | both | a few + PLURAL NOUN

‘All’ and ‘both’ are predeterminers, meaning they come before other determiners.  For example: “All the things”, “both our children” In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 22 in DETERMINERS is defined as: increasing range of quantifying determiners with plural nouns ‘all’, ‘both’, ‘a few’ In iWeb: all|both _NN2 1 BOTH SIDES 258617 2 ALL THINGS …

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At the end of the day (FOCUS EXPRESSIONS)

‘at the end of the day‘ can be used literally, meaning the time of day, but is also an informal phrase that means:  when everything is taken into consideration.   *It contains the most common 5 part N-gram in English: ‘at the end of the’ iWeb 392146 English Grammar Profile C1 Point 8 in the category …

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adverbial phrases with AT

‘AT‘ is by far the most common as a simple preposition. (II) 2 AT is also used in two-part adverbial phrases. (RR21) 1 AT ALL 1232801 Maybe they weren’t thinking about anything at all. listen 2 AT FIRST 403759 At first, I thought they worked for the government. listen 3 AT ONCE 222526 4 AT BEST 111972 5 AT PRESENT 83432 6 AT LAST 77484 7 AT MOST …

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ALL | SOME | BOTH | HALF + OF + noun phrase

Here’s an example of determiners premodifying nouns: I regret some of the things I said to you. A2 point 18 in the category of NOUNS/phrases is defined: form simple noun phrases by pre-modifying nouns with an increasing range of determiners. A2 point 17 in the category of PRONOUNS: limited range of pronouns (‘all’, ‘both’) with ‘of’ followed by an object pronoun, to …

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adverbial phrases with ‘AND’

The second most common word in English is ‘AND’  which is usually a conjunction.  It’s also used in complex adverbial phrases: and so on (A2 in the English Vocabulary Profile EVP) I need you to help me with my bags and so on. listen Also, note that ‘and so forth‘ is not listed in the EVP, but is listed in OXFORD at B1: I‘ve had ample opportunity to observe Browning and adopt his physical presence, study his mannerisms, and so …

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evaluative relative clause ‘… which is good’

In the English Grammar Profile, B2 Point 100 in the category of CLAUSES is hard to find formally as it is more USE related as the relative clause: refers to a whole clause or sentence, often to express an opinion or evaluation or give a reason. This is also found in PEARSON’S: GSE 61 B2 …

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