very

too | very | so + many | few

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 102 in PRONOUNS/quantity is defined: MODIFIED: ‘few’ and ‘many’ with ‘very’, ‘too’, ‘so’ as intensifiers For example: If the chef answered YES to the number being less than 500, we‘d have four options, which is too many. TED It‘s been a crushing disappointment for me and for so many. TED And very few have it in them. LISTEN *’very few’ + noun is B2 A search in iWeb for: * * too|very|so many|few . 1 THERE ARE SO MANY. …

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few (not many)

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 27 in NEGATION is defined as: (very) ‘few’ meaning ‘not many’ to refer to people in formal written contexts, often reports or surveys. *This also overlaps C1 quantity pronouns. A search in iWeb for:  few _V 1 FEW ARE 18250 Many are called, few are chosen. listen 2 FEW HAVE 15340 And very few have it in them. …

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‘major cities’, ‘very beginning’ (major | very + noun)

For this C2 grammar, ‘major’ is an adjective meaning: important, serious, or significant. ‘Very’ is an adjective meaning: actual or precise, with emphasis on the exact quality of the following noun or an extreme point in time/space. Point 73 under the category of adjectives in C2 on the English Grammar Profile these two vocabulary items …

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almost all & very few

In the English Grammar Profile, B2 point 51 in the category of adverbs/phrases is defined as: degree adverbs (‘almost’, ‘very’) to modify determiners. Adverbs phrases can be put together with degree adverbs such as “almost” and “very” to modify determiners, such as “all” and “few”. *.[RR] *.[DB] After removing a few unrelated results to the …

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