present perfect continuous (recent past)

present perfect continuous (recent past)

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Point 71 in the category of PAST is defined as:

the present perfect continuous to focus on a finished activity in the recent past but where the effects or results are still important or relevant.

The only example given in the EGP follows the structure:

_jj _cs * have|has been _vvg

However, iWeb does not allow searching for it.  The NOW corpus allows _jj when * have|has been _vvg 

but it is incredibly rare with only single examples.  The most decent shorter Ngrams we can get are on NOW corpus for:


1 WHEN THEY HAVE BEEN DRINKING 31

  WalesOnline
Swansea’s most haunted places you can visit this Halloween
He has been spotted on several occasions, though only by women and, only when they have been drinking sherry!

*this example is not one finished activity in the past though.


2 WHEN INFLATION HAS BEEN RUNNING 28 (almost all of these 28 are identical quotes)

  • This has all happened at a time when inflation has been running at about half those rates.

3 WHEN YOU HAVE BEEN WORKING 25
4 WHEN YOU HAVE BEEN PLAYING 24
5 WHEN THEY HAVE BEEN WORKING 16
6 WHEN YOU HAVE BEEN DRINKING 16


7 WHEN IT HAS BEEN RAINING 14

Stoke-on-Trent Live
Police are reminding people to drive safely when it has been raining after being called to an upside down car in someone’s garden.
Jun 19, 2020
*the previous clause to our highlighted structure is not a past event.
  Liverpool Echo
Woodland walk with beautiful views and bear pits right here on Merseyside
While the landscape, which can get muddy when it has been raining, isn’t ideal for families taking prams, so we’d suggest taking a sturdy buggy …
Jul 19, 2020

8 WHEN FGV HAS BEEN TAKING 10
9 WHEN HE HAS BEEN DRINKING 10
10 WHEN HE HAS BEEN PLAYING 10

 

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