use

Verb + question word + to infinitive ‘learn how to use’

The WH-adverbs: such as ‘how’, ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘why’ are often called ‘question words’ because they typically introduce interrogative sentences.  However, in this post, we look at the way they introduce other clauses: A search in iWeb for: _V _*Q _TO _VVI   1 LEARN HOW TO USE 24468 Learn how to use it. (EVP A2 how = …

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really | always | sometimes + VERB

The first point in the English Grammar Profile! A1 point 1 in the category of ADVERBS is defined: adverbs of degree and time to modify verbs. An iWeb search for: really|always|sometimes _VV   1 REALLY WANT 213278 I really want a brother.   Listen to the pronunciation 2 REALLY LIKE 181415 3 REALLY NEED 161580 4 REALLY KNOW …

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didn’t use to + INFINITVE

Point 60 in MODALITY: ‘used to’ to talk about repeated actions or states in the past that are no longer true. Point 32 in VERBS: semi-modal auxiliary verbs, ‘used to’ and ‘ought to’ *We have already got dedicated pages to semi-modals: See an overview of ‘ought to‘ and ‘used to’ as semi-modal. Since we have …

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used to (questions)

Point 201 in MODALITY is defined as ‘used to’ QUESTIONS For example:   The New York Times Opinion | Nine Nonobvious Ways to Have Deeper Conversations What problem did you use to have but now have licked? 19 Nov 2020     The following list does not specify whether or not it is basic past simple.  It must be manually checked. …

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like | want (verb pattern)

Let’s look at the like and ‘want verb pattern’.  They are different because  ‘like’ can be followed by to-infinitve or Verb-ing.   ‘want’ is only followed by the to-infinitive.  For example: “I like using the internet” or “I like to use the internet.” have the same meaning.  “I want to use the internet.” is correct, but …

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may adverb

B2 point 150 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: ‘may’ with an increasing range of adverbs (most commonly ‘even’, ‘only’, ‘already’, ‘never’, ‘just’, ‘sometimes’) in the normal mid-position after the modal verb. B1 point 70:  ‘may’ with a limited range of adverbs (most commonly ‘also’) in the normal mid-position after the modal verb …

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