treat

MORE * THAN (complex comparisions)

A simple comparison in English is “She is more important than you.” One way to make comparisons more complex is to increase the number of words between ‘more’ and ‘than.’  This could include nouns or adjectives followed by non-finite clauses such as in the following EXPERT EXAMPLES: Today, billions of citizens have  more tools, more access to information, more capacity to influence  than ever before. TED It‘s harder to compose than to play. TLC native …

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Dare (question)

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 198 in MODALITY is defined as: ‘dare’ question form A search in iWeb for: Dare _P _VVI 1 DARE I SAY 8113 2 DARE WE SAY 1864 3 DARE YOU SAY 226 4 DARE I ASK 195 5 DARE I SUGGEST 157 6 DARE I MENTION 118 7 …

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How dare you!

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 187 in MODALITY is defined as:  ‘how dare’ to express disapproval or offence about something. For example: “What? How dare you!” the queen huffs. A search in iWeb: 1 HOW DARE YOU ! ” 94 2 HOW DARE YOU SAY THAT 89 3 HOW DARE YOU TRY TO 64 4 …

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‘It is said that …’ (IT + passive)

Let’s take a look at an IELTS writing task 2 example with this grammar: It is argued that volunteering should be made a part of the school curriculum. In the above example, ‘is argued‘ forms the passive part.  The active form of this is probably: ‘People argue that…” In our example, ‘people’ is not important or maybe we don’t know who …

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