survive

modal verb + YET

At C2 in the English Vocabulary Profile: could/may/might, etc. yet used to say there is still a possibility that something will happen For example: We may yet one day realize the vision of having the internet in our brains. TED And it seems like it‘s very possible that your nation, despite, actually because of the intense problems you face,  you may yet be the warning light to the world that shines most visibly, most powerfully. TED   NOW corpus search for: _VM yet _VVI 1 MAY YET PROVE 889 2 COULD YET PROVE 662 3 …

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MORE * THAN (complex comparisions)

A simple comparison in English is “She is more important than you.” One way to make comparisons more complex is to increase the number of words between ‘more’ and ‘than.’  This could include nouns or adjectives followed by non-finite clauses such as in the following EXPERT EXAMPLES: Today, billions of citizens have more tools, more access to information, more capacity to influence than ever before. TED It‘s harder to compose than to play. TLC native speaker the …

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might not + bare infinitive

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 73 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘might’ negative form ‘Might not + infinitive‘ means that there is a chance someone or something won’t do or happen. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: Even though she has a very good relationship with children, she might not be good at raising them. Chinese Female level 3 reading class   TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: I might not earn as much as others do. …

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may not

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 94 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘may’ negative PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: However, you may not deny that you can not buy happiness even if you have too much money. Korean male, level 4 writing class. An iWeb search for: may_VM not _V*I 1 MAY NOT KNOW 28529 2 MAY NOT WORK 22681 3 MAY NOT WANT 17165 4 MAY …

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THE ONE(S) THAT + clause (focus)

Here are two examples of ‘focus’ in English grammar, using ‘the one that + clause’ in the subject position: The one that comes in the box, his colleague told him, was notorious for making users’faces itchy and red.   The Wall Street Journal The ones that make you look older, or even the ones where you turn into a hot dog are still really engaging.    Mobile Marketing Magazine In the English Grammar Profile, C2 point 114 in the category of PRONOUNS/substitution is defined as: ‘The one(s) that’ + …

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few (not many)

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 27 in NEGATION is defined as: (very) ‘few’ meaning ‘not many’ to refer to people in formal written contexts, often reports or surveys. *This also overlaps C1 quantity pronouns. A search in iWeb for:  few _V 1 FEW ARE 18250 Many are called, few are chosen. listen 2 FEW HAVE 15340 And very few have it in them. …

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