significant

extent

In the English Vocabulary Profile, the B2 noun ‘extent’ is listed in phrases with ‘to’. NOUN: the size or importance of something mainly in some ways A search in NOW corpus for: to_II * * extent 1 TO A LARGE EXTENT 15605 After all, life will always be to a large extent what we ourselves make it. listen 2 TO A CERTAIN EXTENT 14788 3 TO A …

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can be

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 98 in the category of modality is defined: GENERAL TRUTHS AND TENDENCIES: ‘can be’ TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: Their students can get good grades and their income can be higher. male China B1 We follow the EGP example patterns in iWeb: _NN can_VM be _R _J 1 RATES CAN BE AS HIGH 102 2 RATE CAN BE …

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adverb + adjective + noun

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 32 in the category of NOUNs is defined as: complex noun phrases with adverb + adjective + noun EXPERT EXAMPLE: And, you know, this is a fairly transparent example. wnpr.org *This overlaps B1 noun phrases in the category of ADJECTIVES and clashes with C1 in the category of modality (emphasis). A search in iWeb for: …

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adverb + adjective (emphasis)

An adjective phrase can consist of an adverb + adjective.  In the following examples: ‘obvious‘ and ‘unlikely‘ are the head of the adjective phrases. Needless to say, Ares’ negotiating position was hugely strengthened when it became painfully obvious to everyone  that the giant US asset manager was the only bidder that had bothered to turn up at the auction. traveller.com.au   Therefore, all 42 Sinn Fein candidates would likely have to be elected to the 160-seat chamber  to give it a shot at emerging as the largest party, an outcome which remains highly unlikely. express.co.uk   The adverbs ‘painfully’ and ‘highly’ are used here to emphasize. C1 …

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It’s + adjective + ‘that’ clause (focus)

When we look at the most common examples with the grammar pattern: ‘it is adjective that clause’ It is clear that he stole it.  It is possible that the police won’t find him.  It is likely that the man will get away. We see they all appear to have modal adjectives (clear, possible, likely) that show how sure we are about the following clause using ‘FOCUS’.  Two of …

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adjective + BUT + adjective + noun (complex noun phrase)

Here are some examples of this form:
Being nice to someone is a SIMPLE BUT EFFECTIVE WAY of making friends.
Some herbs like MOIST BUT WELL-DRAINED SOIL.
I am making SLOW BUT STEADY PROGRESS with my language learning.
Although she is usually easy to get along with, she does have a RARE BUT SERIOUS SIDE to her personality too.
A SMALL BUT SIGNIFICANT NUMBER of students didn’t pass the test.

(slightly | a bit | much) + COMPARATIVE

Let’s explain an expert example of the C1 grammar structure: ‘a bit’ + comparative adjective phrase.   Remember that adjectives are usually premodified by adverb phrases. Usually, the premodifier is an intensifier.  For example, ‘very good‘ or ‘much better‘.  The adverb ‘very’ intensifies the adjective ‘good’.   (‘Very‘ cannot intensify comparative adjectives.)  ‘Much‘ intensifies the comparative adjective: …

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