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IF clause + SHALL clause

Here’s an expert example of using a conditional clause + ‘shall’ clause to express modality: Come on, if we don’t share a similar social consciousness, how shall we discuss social problems? Listen to this sentence. C2 point 225 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘shall’ in the main clause after an ‘if-‘ clause conditionals Long open queries are impossible on iWeb, so here we first look for the …

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noun phrase + relative clause

Here are two student examples of complex noun phrases using relative clauses as complements: In addition, the people who lived in Korea 100 years ago didn’t have enough transportation. PELIC Arabic male level 5 writing class   Here are some of the things which I got. TLC speaking test female Kannada B2 A2 point 34 in CLAUSES is defined: a defining relative clause with ‘who‘ as the subject A2 point 20 in …

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modal verb (question)

Here are more overlapping points across the English Grammar Profile.  We have included their examples when needed too elaborate: A2 point 14 in CLAUSES: AFFIRMATIVE interrogative clauses (‘yes/no’ forms) with modal auxiliary verbs. Would you like to come with me? Will you go with me? Can I come tomorrow to collect it? (Can you|we…? is listed at A1) Shall we meet at 7.30 pm? (Here are …

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COULD (range)

A2 point 52 in MODALITY: ‘could’ with a limited range of verbs to make suggestions. A2 point 27 in MODALITY: negative form B1 point 78 in MODALITY: affirmative form of ‘could’ to talk about ability. B1 point 79 in MODALITY: ‘could’ with an increasing range of verbs to make suggestions. An iWeb search for: could …

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might not + bare infinitive

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 73 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘might’ negative form ‘Might not + infinitive‘ means that there is a chance someone or something won’t do or happen. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: Even though she has a very good relationship with children, she might not be good at raising them. Chinese Female level 3 reading class   TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: I might not earn as much as others do. …

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may not

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 94 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘may’ negative PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: However, you may not deny that you can not buy happiness even if you have too much money. Korean male, level 4 writing class. An iWeb search for: may_VM not _V*I 1 MAY NOT KNOW 28529 2 MAY NOT WORK 22681 3 MAY NOT WANT 17165 4 MAY …

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TO HAVE TO

Point 117 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘have to’ as an infinitive form *This will overlap sometimes with B2 adjectives followed by an infinitive. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: A child is very expensive, this causes parents to have to work more, which can lead to frustration and anger. Taiwanese female, level 4 writing class. An iWeb search for: * _TO have _TO _VVI 1 GOING TO HAVE TO GET 4269 …

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may | might (modal verbs)

A2 points 34 and 48 in the category of MODALITY are defined as: ‘may‘ to talk about weak possibility referring to the present and the future affirmative A2 point 47: ‘might’ … weak possibility. An iWeb search for: may_VM _VVI 1 MAY NEED 294017 2 MAY WANT 253501 3 MAY TAKE 159078 4 MAY INCLUDE 156112 …

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each other

Point 60 in the category of PRONOUNS/reciprocal is defined as: ‘each other’ as the object of a verb or complement of a preposition to talk about the mutual behaviour of two or more people. An iWeb search for: * * * each other 1 ON TOP OF EACH OTHER 13130 (note that many of these …

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BOTH | A FEW

Point 61 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity is defined as: ‘BOTH’, ‘A FEW’, ‘ANOTHER’ as subject and object pronouns. *We have covered the use of ‘another’ here. A search in iWeb corpus for: . both _V 1 . BOTH ARE 48684 2 . BOTH HAVE 15241 3 . BOTH WERE 15188 4 . BOTH WILL …

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VERB + DIRECT OBJECT + to INFINITIVE

This post contains an example of overlapping B1 grammar points located inside two different categories in the English Grammar Profile (EGP). EGP B1 point 6 in the category of REPORTED SPEECH is defined as: REPORTED REQUESTS AND COMMANDS with ‘ask’ or ‘tell’ + direct object and ‘to-‘infinitive EGP B1 point 38 in the category of …

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love | hate | prefer + VERBing | to INFINITVE

Point 19 VERBS/patterns is defined as: verbs expressing preference followed either by a ‘to’-infinitive or an ‘-ing’ form, with no change in meaning. *Much of this grammar overlaps A2 Modality, for example, “I would love to share with you.”   A search in iWeb for LOVE _VVG 1 LOVE SEEING 14175 2 LOVE USING 13703 3 LOVE WORKING …

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DO + verb (imperative)

‘Do’ can be put before the imperative verb or auxiliary to make it less abrupt and more persuasive. In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 64 in the category of CLAUSES/imperatives is defined as: ‘DO’: base form of a main verb, for emphasis or in formal contexts A search in iWeb for: . Do _VVI …

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do + VERB (emphasis)

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 79 in the category of CLAUSES is defined as: auxiliary verb ‘do’ in an affirmative declarative clause, for emphasis and affirmation. *Note that ‘did’ for emphasis is C1. A search in iWeb for: do _VVI 1 DO KNOW 89665 2 DO GET 69098 3 DO THINK 68682 I do think that it is important for people who are being …

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If so (ellipted)

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 43 in the category of CLAUSES/conditional is defined as: ELLIPTED ‘IF SO’, CONFIRMING refer to a previous direct or indirect ‘yes-no’ question where the answer might be ‘yes’.   For example: But then I began to wonder whether a game or an app can really change attitudes and behaviors, and if so, can I measure that change?   A search in iWeb for: ? If so * * 1 …

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WHERE (relative clause)

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 78 in the category of CLAUSES is described as: defining relative clauses with ‘where’ to define nouns referring to place. For example: Her laptop computer is on the top of the desk where it is easy for her to reach. PELIC STUDENT: Chinese, Female, Level 3, Writing Class. *One could argue that ‘where’ could refer to a situation and not just a physical place, and …

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What part of speech is LIKE?

Like is usually a preposition, verb or conjunction. A search in the iWeb and NOW corpora for ‘like’: preposition 1 LIKE (II) 12859907 1  I WAS LIKE, ‘ 43416 When Matthew told me that was yours, I was like, “I walk by there all the time.” listen 2 IT LOOKS LIKE THE EMAIL 36854 3  I ‘M LIKE , ‘ 16067 4  I WAS LIKE , ” 12239 …

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BE + able | allowed + to

This is another post about overlapping grammar points in the English Grammar Profile. B1 point 76 in MODALITY: ‘BE ALLOWED TO’, PERMISSION B1 point 99 in Modality and expressions with be is defined as: a limited range of expressions with ‘be’ + infinitive (‘be allowed to’, ‘be supposed to’, ‘be able to’) with present and …

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