seemed

to be being

There is no entry in the English Grammar Profile for the continuous infinitive passive.  Therefore, we say this is a C2 grammar structure. A search in NOW corpus for: * to be being * 1 BELIEVED TO BE BEING HELD 18 The following example has past passive + infinitive + continuous passive: The driver of the lorry was believed to be being held by police. …

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ALWAYS + past simple

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 25 in the category of PAST simple  is defined as: habitual states or actions. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: They always went back late. Chinese male, level 3, writing class. EXPERT EXAMPLE: He would take me with him on his jobs and say, ” Come on Jo, let’s go do something to make this world a better place.”  His hands were wide and calloused, and they always reminded me of displaced tree roots. TED Both examples in the EGP follow the pattern ‘always + past simple verb’ An iWeb search …

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yours (subject)

Point 57 in the category of PRONOUNS/possessive is defined as: yours with singular reference in subject position. FOR EXAMPLE: The world needs every voice and perspective, and yours is included. A search in iWeb for: yours _VV 1 YOURS LOOKS 1874 2 YOURS LOOK 1099 3 YOURS SOUNDS 428 4 YOURS SEEMS 380 5 YOURS TURNED 346 6 YOURS STAND 340 7 YOURS CAME …

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BOTH | A FEW

Point 61 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity is defined as: ‘BOTH’, ‘A FEW’, ‘ANOTHER’ as subject and object pronouns. *We have covered the use of ‘another’ here. A search in iWeb corpus for: . both _V 1 . BOTH ARE 48684 2 . BOTH HAVE 15241 3 . BOTH WERE 15188 4 . BOTH WILL …

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THE ONE(S) THAT + clause (focus)

Here are two examples of ‘focus’ in English grammar, using ‘the one that + clause’ in the subject position: The one that comes in the box, his colleague told him, was notorious for making users’faces itchy and red.   The Wall Street Journal The ones that make you look older, or even the ones where you turn into a hot dog are still really engaging.    Mobile Marketing Magazine In the English Grammar Profile, C2 point 114 in the category of PRONOUNS/substitution is defined as: ‘The one(s) that’ + …

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adverb + adjective (emphasis)

An adjective phrase can consist of an adverb + adjective.  In the following examples: ‘obvious‘ and ‘unlikely‘ are the head of the adjective phrases. Needless to say, Ares’ negotiating position was hugely strengthened when it became painfully obvious to everyone  that the giant US asset manager was the only bidder that had bothered to turn up at the auction. traveller.com.au   Therefore, all 42 Sinn Fein candidates would likely have to be elected to the 160-seat chamber  to give it a shot at emerging as the largest party, an outcome which remains highly unlikely. express.co.uk   The adverbs ‘painfully’ and ‘highly’ are used here to emphasize. C1 …

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Verb + TO infinitive (range)

A2 point 25 in VERBs/patterns: increasing range of verbs followed by a ‘to’-infinitive. A2 examples include: hope to go remember to bring (this clashes with the B2 point for a change of meaning verb forms) forget to come. B1 Point 43 in VERBS/patterns is defined as: a wide range of verbs followed by a ‘to-‘ infinitive Two …

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MUST HAVE + past participle

In the English Grammar Profile, there are essentially the same two points in the category of Modality at B2 for the same form. Point 144 is defined as: DEDUCTIONS AND CONCLUSIONS: perfect form of ‘must’ to make deductions about the past. and point 166: PAST AFFIRMATIVE must have’ + ‘-ed’. For example: He had come such a long way, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could …

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