PELIC

(PELIC) refers to The University of Pittsburgh English Language Institute Corpus.

If a post refers to any language from this corpus, we tag it PELIC.

nothing | everybody | everywhere | anything (subject)

Point 92 in PRONOUNS is defined as: full range of indefinite pronouns as subjects, with a singular verb. A search inWeb for: . nothing|everybody|everywhere|anything _v And PELIC B2 student examples: 1 . NOTHING IS 18676 25027,ar9,Chinese,Male,529,4,w,3285,1,566 We can lie on the meadow and breathed fresh air. Nothing is better than this. 2 . NOTHING WAS …

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one (pronoun)

This post lists two clashing points in the English Grammar Profile.  The only difference that we can guess from the definition is that the B1 point does not require the subject position. B2 point 91 in PRONOUNS is defined as: ‘ONE’ as a generic personal pronoun in the subject position to mean people in general. …

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each | either | enough | neither | several

Point 89 in the category of PRONOUNS/  quantity is defined as: ‘each’, ‘either’, ‘enough’, ‘neither’, ‘several’ as subject and object pronouns. Two examples from PELIC B2/C1 students: subject pronoun object pronoun Although these vocabulary items are easy to find, they usually are not acting as subjects or objects.  This makes finding more information about the …

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one another

Point 84 in the category of PRONOUNS / reciprocal is defined as: ‘ONE ANOTHER’ as the object of a verb or complement of a preposition to talk about the mutual behaviour of two or more people, often in formal contexts. A search for * * * * one another in iWeb: 1 TO GET TO …

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either of them | us

Point 82 in the category of PRONOUNS quantity is defined as: a wide range of pronouns (‘neither’, ‘either’, ‘none’) with ‘of’ followed by an object pronoun. For example: So in a yin-yang way, silence needs loudness and loudness needs silence for either of them to have any effect. However most of this structure overlaps with Negation point 19, so we will only investigate ‘either of them|us’ in this post. Collocates …

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Pittsburgh learner corpus & complexity checker

I am always looking for true learner texts to see how the complexity checker will perform.  EnglishGrammar.Pro is very lucky to have access to a very large and clearly documented learner corpus. PELIC is based on data collected from students at the English Language Institute (ELI) at the University of Pittsburgh from 2005-2012…. The IEP data include …

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OURS

In the EGP, there are several points in the category of PRONOUNS with the possessive pronoun ‘ours’: C1 Point 101: … in subject position B2 Point 72: … with singular and plural reference, in subject position. B2 Point 86 is the same except: … in object positions, and complement positions after ‘be’ and after prepositions. …

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past perfect simple + adverb

B2 point 54 in the category of  PAST is defined as: past perfect simple with a wide range of adverbs (including ‘finally’, ‘recently’, ‘simply’) in the normal mid-position. B1 point 46 in the category of PAST is defined as: past perfect simple with a limited range of adverbs (including ‘never’, ‘ever’, ‘just’, ‘always’, ‘already’) in …

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ALL | SOME | BOTH | HALF + OF + noun phrase

Here’s an example of determiners premodifying nouns: I regret some of the things I said to you. A2 point 18 in the category of NOUNS/phrases is defined: form simple noun phrases by pre-modifying nouns with an increasing range of determiners. A2 point 17 in the category of PRONOUNS: limited range of pronouns (‘all’, ‘both’) with ‘of’ followed by an object pronoun, to …

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usually | often | never | weekly + (present simple)

There are many points at A2 that are related to adverbs and overlap.  Sadly there is some clash of information between the levels of A1 and A2 though. Point 7 in the category of PRESENT is defined as: present simple WITH ADVERBS OF INDEFINITE FREQUENCY In the example sentences, we find ‘usually’ and ‘always’ used. …

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It’s + adjective + ‘that’ clause (focus)

When we look at the most common examples with the grammar pattern: ‘it is adjective that clause’ It is clear that he stole it.  It is possible that the police won’t find him.  It is likely that the man will get away. We see they all appear to have modal adjectives (clear, possible, likely) that show how sure we are about the following clause using ‘FOCUS’.  Two of …

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Gerunds (verbING)

Here’s a student example of using a verb-ing form as a noun subject: Studying for an exam won’t be hard for you if you follow these steps. PELIC: Chinese male level 3 writing class. Point 22 in NOUNS at A2 is defined as: ‘-ing’ forms of verbs as nouns, in object position, to refer to activities. Examples include: like_II swimming_VVG, and_CC going_VVG shopping_VVG, I_PPIS1 prefer_VV0 dancing_NN1, …

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NO ARTICLE

There are many points that relate to ‘NO ARTICLE’ in the English Grammar Profile.  Although there are overlapping examples across some of the levels, the main difference in regards to marking complexity relies on the level of the vocabulary used.  For this reason, it is probably better to rely more on the English Vocabulary Profile …

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adjective + (that) clause

Here’s a student example of an adjective followed by a ‘that’ clause. However, I am sure that the most useful English for you is American English. PELIC Korean male level 4 writing In the English Grammar Profile (EGP), there are many points that are hard to differentiate and some have conflicting information. EGP point 22 MODALITY/adjectives at A2: BE’ + ‘SURE‘ + CLAUSE …

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