many

determiner + noun phrase (increasing range)

Here’s a student example of a determiner + uncountable noun: My teacher told me “enjoy the music and you will dance naturally.” PELIC Taiwanese female level 3 writing class A2 point 18 in the category of  NOUNS is defined: form simple noun phrases by pre-modifying nouns with an increasing range of determiners. A2 point 24 in the category of NOUNS: form …

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not + any | many | much + NOUN

When grammar points are from the same CEFR level, and in the same category, we believe it is more useful to have a single post that covers them.  Both these A2 points come from the category of DETERMINERS/quantity. Point 15: ‘many’ with plural nouns in negative contexts. Point 23: ‘much’ with uncountable nouns in negative …

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indefinite pronouns (negative context)

In the English Grammar Profile, there are a few grammar points that overlap and clash across CEFR levels A2, B1. In regards to the use of the indefinite pronoun: ‘anything.‘  To make things worse, ‘anything‘ is listed at A1 in the English Vocabulary Profile with an A1 student example:  … I can’t say anything. A2 point …

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Many are the + NOUN + RELATIVE CLAUSE

In the English Grammar Profile, C2 point 117 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity is defined as: complex noun phrases using an inverted form ‘Many’ + ‘are’ + noun phrase, followed by a relative clause, as a focusing device. FOR EXAMPLE:   NBC News Covid is having a devastating impact on children — and the vaccine won’t …

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few | many | most | others (people)

At C1 in the English Grammar Profile, point 106 in the category of PRONOUNS/quantity is defined as: ‘few’, ‘many’, ‘most’, ‘others’ to refer to people in formal written contexts, often reports or surveys. Here are some expert examples: Though in terms of grammar, it is relatively more straightforward than many languages around the world,  but when it comes to pronunciation, many find themselves stumbling. (more context)     Many were plagiarists, some were backstabbers, and there is even a grave robber among them. …

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too | very | so + many | few

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 102 in PRONOUNS/quantity is defined: MODIFIED: ‘few’ and ‘many’ with ‘very’, ‘too’, ‘so’ as intensifiers For example: If the chef answered YES to the number being less than 500, we‘d have four options, which is too many. TED It‘s been a crushing disappointment for me and for so many. TED And very few have it in them. LISTEN *’very few’ + noun is B2 A search in iWeb for: * * too|very|so many|few . 1 THERE ARE SO MANY. …

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some of which | many of whom

Here’s an example of ‘some of’ modifying the relative pronoun ‘which’: I have many connections, some of which are less than reputable. Listen In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 98 in the category of PRONOUNS / quantity is defined as: ‘some of’, ‘many of’ to modify relative pronouns in a relative clause. A search on iWeb for ngrams of some|many of  _**q …

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