JJR

to-infinitive + noun phrase + comparative

In the English Vocabulary Profile at B2: to make matters worse = to make a situation more difficult, unpleasant, etc. If the most common example of to-infinitive + noun + comparative is listed at B2, then it would make sense that other less common should also be considered as B2.  The closest form which is clearly …

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GET + comparative

In the English Vocabulary Profile, listed at B1 is: get worse = to become more ill, unpleasant, difficult, severe, etc. than before For example: But if this thing gets worse, we must close. listen There is no English Grammar Profile point that specifically focuses on GET + comparative A search in NOW corpus for: GET _JJR 1 GET WORSE 42282 2 GETTING …

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ANY + comparative

‘Any’ can be used as an adverb to mean ‘at all’ or ‘in some degree’. Here are expert examples: We‘re not gonna discuss it here any further. Keep The Change You‘re not at university any longer. listen How would that end any differently than last time? Captain America In the English Vocabulary Profile, ‘any’ is listed as ADVERB B1 used in questions and negatives to emphasize a comparative adjective or adverb Do you feel any better? …

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MORE * THAN (complex comparisions)

A simple comparison in English is “She is more important than you.” One way to make comparisons more complex is to increase the number of words between ‘more’ and ‘than.’  This could include nouns or adjectives followed by non-finite clauses such as in the following EXPERT EXAMPLES: Today, billions of citizens have more tools, more access to information, more capacity to influence than ever before. TED It‘s harder to compose than to play. TLC native speaker the …

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comparative adjective + IER

Point 29 in the category of ADJECTIVES is defined as: form comparative adjectives with adjectives of two syllables ending in ‘-y’ by changing the ‘y’ to an ‘I’ and adding ‘-er’ EXPERT EXAMPLE: The column included examples of correct grammar that make speeches and writing easier to understand, whereas mistakes make English weaker and uncomfortable. noozhawk.com An iWeb search for: *ier_JJR 1 EASIER 1010581 2 EARLIER 431393 3 HEALTHIER 186940 4 HEAVIER …

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comparative adjective + THAN + verb-ING

The English Grammar Profile B1 Point 84 in the category of CLAUSES is defined as: ‘than’ + a limited range of non-finite clauses (with -ing), forming the second part of a comparison after a comparative adjective This point partially overlaps PEARSON’S: GSE 62 B2 complex comparisons between verb/noun phrases VERB PHRASE 1/NOUN PHRASE 1 + …

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comparative adjective + THAN + finite clause

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 56 in the category of CLAUSES is defined as: ‘than’ + a finite clause forming the second part of a comparison after a comparative adjective A search in iWeb corpus for: _JJR than _P _VV 1 EASIER THAN YOU THINK 3935 2 CLOSER THAN YOU THINK 927 3 HARDER THAN …

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MAKE + object + adjective

In the English Grammar Profile, point 52 at B1 in ADJECTIVES/position is defined as: adjectives as object complement after ‘make’. *However, this clashes with B2: where ‘it’ introduces a reference. *Note, if you capitalise your search term such as MAKE on iWeb, it will give you all forms of the word. A search in iWeb …

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a (little) bit + COMPARATIVE

Point 50 at B1 in the English Grammar Profile in the category of ADJECTIVES is defined as: ‘A (LITTLE) BIT’ to modify comparative adjectives used predicatively after a verb, usually ‘be’ However, ‘a little bit’ is considered as B2 in the EVP. And this B1 point also clashes completely with the C1 grammar point explained …

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comparative AND comparative

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 47 in Adjectives is defined as: ‘and’ to repeat a comparative adjective to indicate change over time, usually after ‘become’ or ‘get’ However, the English Vocabulary Profile lists ‘worse and worse‘ at B2  used to emphasize how unpleasant, difficult, severe, etc. something is becoming A search in iWeb corpus: _V …

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EVEN + comparative adjective

In this post, we explore ‘even + comparative’ which is used to emphasize qualities. In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 40 in ADJECTIVES is defined as: ‘even’ to modify and intensify comparative adjectives used predicatively after a verb, usually ‘be’ and ‘get’. We did an iWeb search for even _JJ and highlighted the A2 comparative adjectives: …

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‘He’s not that much better’ (not that much + COMPARATIVE)

  Yardbarker The Bears’ quarterback has been better of late, but not that much better. *’of late‘ means recently. Point 78 in ADJECTIVES/comparatives is defined as: ‘not that much’ to modify comparative adjectives to a small degree in iWeb: 1 NOT THAT MUCH BETTER 280 2 NOT THAT MUCH BIGGER 109 It’s just not that much bigger. gundogsupply.com (listen to a similar sentence) 3 NOT …

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‘There’s no better example than China.’ (NO | ‘NOT ANY’ + comparative)

Let’s look at an expert example of limiting comparison: Now, these people are no more special than any of us. (listen to this sentence) ‘no more‘ = not more Point 74 in the category of ADJECTIVES is defined as: ‘no’ / ‘not any’ to limit the scale of comparison. (comparative clauses) *But really this grammar is equally useful with comparative adverb phrases. …

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comparative + hers | ours

Point 76 in the category of PRONOUNS is defined as: Possessive pronouns ‘hers’ and ‘ours’ in comparative clauses. An iWeb search for  _jj as|than hers|ours: 1 DIFFERENT THAN OURS 491 EXPERT EXAMPLE: His approach was totally different than ours. *’ from ours’ is traditionally correct, but this is the highest frequency example! 2 IMPORTANT AS OURS 470 3 GOOD AS …

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comparative adjective list

BETTER AIRIER ANGRIER APTER BADDER BALDER BEEFIER BETTER-INFORMED BETTER-KNOWN BETTER-LOOKING BETTER-OFF BETTER-THAN-EXPECTED BIGGER BLACKER BLEAKER BLONDER BLOODIER BLUER BLUNTER BLURRIER BOLDER BOSSIER BOUNCIER BRAINIER BRASHER BRAVER BRIEFER BRIGHTER BROADER BROWNER BULKIER BUMPIER BUSHIER BUSIER BUSTIER CALMER CAMPER CATHETER CHEAPER CHEWIER CHILLIER CHUNKIER CLASSIER CLEANER CLEARER CLEVERER CLOSER CLOUDIER CLUNKIER COARSER COLDER COMFIER COOLER COSTLIER COZIER …

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(slightly | a bit | much) + COMPARATIVE

Let’s explain an expert example of the C1 grammar structure: ‘a bit’ + comparative adjective phrase.   Remember that adjectives are usually premodified by adverb phrases. Usually, the premodifier is an intensifier.  For example, ‘very good‘ or ‘much better‘.  The adverb ‘very’ intensifies the adjective ‘good’.   (‘Very‘ cannot intensify comparative adjectives.)  ‘Much‘ intensifies the comparative adjective: …

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THE + comparative phrases ‘The more you have, the better it is.’

In the English Grammar Profile, B2 point 56 in the category of DETERMINERS and articles is defined as “the” in comparative phrases ‘more’, ‘less’, ‘worse’, ‘better’ * the more’, ‘less’, ‘worse’ * to talk about one thing that is affected by another. comparative clauses For example: The broader the sentiment across business, the more influence and power there is to make change. timesnewsgroup.com.au   The more guns there are here, the more likely there is to …

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‘It is better to give than to receive.’ (comparative non-finite clause)

Here are some examples of a wide range of comparative non-finite clauses: The numbers are higher than expected. (using a past participle/adjective) To be kind is more important than to be right. (using TO infinitive) It may now be cheaper to buy than to rent. (using TO infinitive) B2 Point 103 in the category of CLAUSES & comparatives is defined …

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‘It’s a lot easier’ (verb + ‘A LOT’ + comparative adjective)

‘a lot’ means something like: ‘very’, ‘much’ ‘to a large degree.’ Here are a few sentences to understand how we make ‘stronger’ comparisons: It is easy. It is very easy. (strong) It is easier. (comparison) It is a lot easier. (stronger comparison) B2 Point 67 in the category of ADJECTIVES in the English Grammar Profile …

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