imagine

modal verb (question)

Here are more overlapping points across the English Grammar Profile.  We have included their examples when needed too elaborate: A2 point 14 in CLAUSES: AFFIRMATIVE interrogative clauses (‘yes/no’ forms) with modal auxiliary verbs. Would you like to come with me? Will you go with me? Can I come tomorrow to collect it? (Can you…? is listed at A1) Shall we meet at 7.30 pm? (Here are many …

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COULD (range)

A2 point 52 in MODALITY: ‘could’ with a limited range of verbs to make suggestions. B1 point 78 in MODALITY: affirmative form of ‘could’ to talk about ability. B1 point 79 in MODALITY: ‘could’ with an increasing range of verbs to make suggestions. An iWeb search for: could _VVI 1 COULD GET 239338 TLC STUDENT …

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VERB + myself | yourself | himself | itself | herself

B1 Point 55 in the category of PRONOUNS is defined as: increasing range of singular reflexive pronouns with an increasing range of verbs to refer to actions where the subject and object of the verb are the same. A2 Point 12: range of singular reflexive pronouns (‘myself’, ‘yourself’) with a limited range of verbs (‘enjoy’, …

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nothing | anyone | everywhere

Point 58 in the category of PRONOUNS is defined as: wide range of indefinite pronouns as objects or complements. A search in iWeb for: _VV nothing|anyone|everywhere 1 KNOW NOTHING 29235 2 THINK ANYONE 22892 3 SAY NOTHING 17229 4 KNOW ANYONE 16116 5 TELL ANYONE 15737 6 KNEW NOTHING 14617 7 LET ANYONE 14570 TLC …

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as you might (SHARED KNOWLEDGE)

Point 90 in MODALITY is defined as: ‘might’ in phrases, such as ‘as you might know’, ‘have already heard’, to focus the reader on shared knowledge. 1 AS YOU MIGHT EXPECT , 6532 2 AS YOU MIGHT THINK . 3862 3 AS YOU MIGHT IMAGINE , 3657 4 AS YOU MIGHT HAVE GUESSED 2253 As …

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verb + new subject + verbING

Point 52 in VERBS/patterns is defined as: introducing a new subject before the ‘-ing’ form (using noun or object pronoun) _VV _P _V*G *Notice that the ‘get/keep somebody doing somthing’  grammar structure is frequent here.  Also, not all pronouns/nouns are subjects of a new clause. Much of this is still B2 as ‘verbs of the …

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