expect

Verb + question word + to infinitive ‘learn how to use’

The WH-adverbs: such as ‘how’, ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘why’ are often called ‘question words’ because they typically introduce interrogative sentences.  However, in this post, we look at the way they introduce other clauses: A search in iWeb for: _V _*Q _TO _VVI   1 LEARN HOW TO USE 24468 Learn how to use it. (EVP A2 how = …

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WHAT IS IT YOU WANT? (relative clause question)

Let’s analyse questions that have relative clauses to give emphasis.  So usually, we would say something like: What do we want to ask?  What are we trying to find out here? You can see the normal auxiliary verbs ‘be’ and ‘do’ get removed and relative clauses are added in the EXPERT EXAMPLES: What is it that we want …

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You might

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 92 in MODALITY is defined as: ‘might’ to make polite suggestions and give advice. We cannot automatically check a corpus for usage, but we can follow the EGP examples which both contain the pronoun ‘you’. An iWeb search for: You might * * * 1 YOU MIGHT BE …

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modal verb (question)

Here are more overlapping points across the English Grammar Profile.  We have included their examples when needed too elaborate: A2 point 14 in CLAUSES: AFFIRMATIVE interrogative clauses (‘yes/no’ forms) with modal auxiliary verbs. Would you like to come with me? Will you go with me? Can I come tomorrow to collect it? (Can you|we…? is listed at A1) Shall we meet at 7.30 pm? (Here are …

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might not + bare infinitive

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 73 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘might’ negative form ‘Might not + infinitive‘ means that there is a chance someone or something won’t do or happen. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: Even though she has a very good relationship with children, she might not be good at raising them. Chinese Female level 3 reading class   TLC STUDENT SPEAKING TEST EXAMPLE: I might not earn as much as others do. …

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TO HAVE TO

Point 117 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘have to’ as an infinitive form *This will overlap sometimes with B2 adjectives followed by an infinitive. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: A child is very expensive, this causes parents to have to work more, which can lead to frustration and anger. Taiwanese female, level 4 writing class. An iWeb search for: * _TO have _TO _VVI 1 GOING TO HAVE TO GET 4269 …

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indefinite pronouns (negative context)

In the English Grammar Profile, there are a few grammar points that overlap and clash across CEFR levels A2, B1. In regards to the use of the indefinite pronoun: ‘anything.‘  To make things worse, ‘anything‘ is listed at A1 in the English Vocabulary Profile with an A1 student example:  … I can’t say anything. A2 point …

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nothing | anyone | everywhere

in the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 58 in the category of PRONOUNS is defined as: wide range of indefinite pronouns as objects or complements. For example: You don’t have to show anyone any of these steps. TED *We have taken the 3 pronouns found in the EGP examples as the basis for our search in iWeb corpus: _VV nothing|anyone|everywhere …

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as you might (SHARED KNOWLEDGE)

Point 90 in MODALITY is defined as: ‘might’ in phrases, such as ‘as you might know’, ‘have already heard’, to focus the reader on shared knowledge. 1 AS YOU MIGHT EXPECT , 6532 2 AS YOU MIGHT THINK . 3862 3 AS YOU MIGHT IMAGINE , 3657 4 AS YOU MIGHT HAVE GUESSED 2253 As …

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would (habitual past)

B2 point 160 in MODALITY is defined as: ‘would’ to talk about habitual actions and events in the past It formally overlaps A2 point 26 in MODALITY: ‘would’ to talk about imagined situations. Looking in iWeb corpus manually for collocates of ‘every’ ‘time‘ with ‘would’ is 1 in 5 on the usage: … my mom also helped raise my nephews, who would stay with her every summer when school was out. Gone …

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Do not (imperative)

In the English Grammar Profile, B2 Point 99 in the category of  CLAUSES & imperatives is defined as: ‘DO NOT’ for EMPHASIS in formal contexts We do not believe ‘formality’ is essential to make this structure B2. *We have expanded this point because the first person imperative can be negated simply by inserting ‘not’ after the …

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