everyone

indefinite pronoun + ELSE

The adverb ‘else’ is only a postmodifier. It follows indefinite pronouns. In the English Grammar Profile, A2 point 14 in the category of PRONOUNS: indefinite pronouns with ‘else’ We did a search in iWeb corpus for: _PN1 else 1 SOMEONE ELSE 335976 I would like to choose my sister as a guardian because I can’t imagine someone else. PELIC student: French male level 3 reading …

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verb + object + clause

Point 12 in the category of VERBS/patterns is defined: verbs, typically reporting verbs, followed by a noun or pronoun as the indirect object and a clause with or without ‘that’, as the direct object. *Note some of our search results are not indirect objects.  However, the A2 complexity is still there with relative clauses. _VV …

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I suggest | apologise | recommend

Point 21 in the category of PRESENT/simple is defined: a limited range of speech act verbs, including ‘suggest’, ‘apologise’, ‘recommend’. *Some of these will clash with C1:  suggest-recommend-insist + present-simple   PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: In conclusion, I suggest that international students whose English abilities are not strong enough should study in the ELI for at least one term before attending colleges or universities. Chinese male – level 5 writing class. A search for: I suggest|recommend|apologize * …

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LET | MAKE + object + verb ‘make you feel’ ‘let me know’

Let’s look at an active voice structure that means: (MAKE) to force or cause someone to do something (often they do not want to do it) (LET)  to allow, make something possible or give permission In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 30 in the category of VERBs/patterns is defined as: ‘MAKE’, ‘LET’ + INFINITIVE …

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VERB + DIRECT OBJECT + to INFINITIVE

This post contains an example of overlapping B1 grammar points located inside two different categories in the English Grammar Profile (EGP). EGP B1 point 6 in the category of REPORTED SPEECH is defined as: REPORTED REQUESTS AND COMMANDS with ‘ask’ or ‘tell’ + direct object and ‘to-‘infinitive EGP B1 point 38 in the category of …

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understand | realise + that CLAUSE

In the English Grammar Profile, B1 Point 42 in the category of VERBS/patterns is defined as: an increasing range of verbs, typically reporting or mental process verbs, with a ‘that’-clause as the direct object PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: I started to understand that there are many types of movies, and I started to distinguish between them. Arabic, Male, Level 4, Writing Class. *Note that this partly overlaps ’28 …

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Not + everyone | everything | every | all

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 26 in the category of NEGATION is defined as: ‘not’ with indefinite pronouns ‘everyone’ and ‘everything’ and determiners ‘every’, ‘all’ For example: Not everyone is always looking for easier. (more context) Besides, not everyone needs a decent education. (more context) PELIC student example: level 3 Portuguese female: Finally, not all things you think to do in this world can turn out in the way you try to do them. …

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indefinite pronouns: SOMEBODY SOMEONE EVERYBODY EVERYONE

A search in iWeb corpus for: _PN1 1 SOMETHING 7038440 2 ONE 7014912 3 EVERYTHING 3661675 4 SOMEONE 3447852 5 ANYTHING 3347394 6 EVERYONE 3007402 7 NOTHING 2966176 8 ANYONE 2741077 9 NO ONE 863063 (PN121 PN122) 10 EVERYBODY 476935 11 NOBODY 451477 12 SOMEBODY 350684 13 ANYBODY 307399 Here’s a student example of the …

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their (GENERIC)

Here’s an expert example of using ‘their’ with a general reference: Tech Guide It‘s based on the idea that people learn best when they are actively involved in their education.   The use of ‘their’ is confusing to give level to, because there is differing information between the English Vocabulary and Grammar Profiles, and secondly the uses are hard to locate in corpora automatically. At B2, …

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