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Verb + question word + to infinitive ‘learn how to use’

The WH-adverbs: such as ‘how’, ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘why’ are often called ‘question words’ because they typically introduce interrogative sentences.  However, in this post, we look at the way they introduce other clauses: A search in iWeb for: _V _*Q _TO _VVI   1 LEARN HOW TO USE 24468 Learn how to use it. (EVP A2 how = …

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TO HAVE TO

Point 117 in the category of MODALITY is defined: ‘have to’ as an infinitive form *This will overlap sometimes with B2 adjectives followed by an infinitive. PELIC STUDENT EXAMPLE: A child is very expensive, this causes parents to have to work more, which can lead to frustration and anger. Taiwanese female, level 4 writing class. An iWeb search for: * _TO have _TO _VVI 1 GOING TO HAVE TO GET 4269 …

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‘Not sure if it is.’ (NOT + non-finite or ellipted clause)

Let’s look at the most common examples of non-finite or ellipted claused used after ‘not’. Usually, we would say: I am not sure if it is possible. But we can remove the subject and verb to make an ellipted clause: Not sure if it is possible. We can also say: This is a petrol car …

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adverb + adjective + noun

Point 32 in the category of NOUNs is defined as: complex noun phrases with adverb + adjective + noun EXPERT EXAMPLE: And, you know, this is a fairly transparent example. wnpr.org *This overlaps B1 noun phrases in the category of ADJECTIVES and clashes with C1 in the category of modality (emphasis). A search in iWeb for: _RR _JJ _NN 1 PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE …

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SUCH + adjective + noun

Point 41 in the category of  NOUNS is defined as: noun phrases with ‘such a’ + adjective + singular noun and ‘such’ + adjective + plural noun, to give emphasis.   An iWeb search for: such a _JJ _NN 1 SUCH A LONG TIME 7187 2 SUCH A BIG DEAL 6247 3 SUCH A SHORT …

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negation with modality ‘not necessarily’

Here are examples of using stance adverbs with negative modality: It will not necessarily be progress for India if she simply imports the unhappiness of the West. listen Now‘s not actually a great time to talk. listen Here are two formally overlapping C1 grammar points in the English Grammar Profile: Point 200 in MODALITY/adverbs is defined as: ‘NOT NECESSARILY to express a possible exception to a general perception, i.e. not in every case. Point 23 …

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