choose

may | might + as well

If you want to make an unenthusiastic suggestion or say you are not enjoying, interested in, or approving of something, then you can use this grammar structure with ‘may as well‘ or ‘might as well‘. Here are some examples.  The first is a student speaking test example: You might as well just open the door to an unknown person. TLC female Mexico B2 Expert …

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adverbs in mid position

Here’s an example of an adverb after a modal verb + academic collocation: We would likely address these issues one after the other in a sequential way. listen to this sentence A2 point 30 in the category of ADVERBS: MID POSITION between the subject and the main verb and after modal verbs, auxiliary verbs and ‘be’. General points such as these do not specify that there are …

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STRANDED PREPOSITION

This post is about two points in the English Grammar Profile found in two different categories and two different CEFR levels.  Differentiating them depends on what prepositional verbs are.  A combination of the verb and preposition has an idiomatic expression with a distinct meaning.  However, the English Vocabulary Profile gives a better idea of the …

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may adverb

B2 point 150 in the category of MODALITY is defined as: ‘may’ with an increasing range of adverbs (most commonly ‘even’, ‘only’, ‘already’, ‘never’, ‘just’, ‘sometimes’) in the normal mid-position after the modal verb. B1 point 70:  ‘may’ with a limited range of adverbs (most commonly ‘also’) in the normal mid-position after the modal verb …

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