better

had better

Surprisingly, there is no entry in the English Grammar Profile for the phrase ‘had better’.  In the English Vocabulary Profile, ‘had better’ with the meaning ‘should’ is listed at A2. You had better get out of this room and back downstairs right away. listen A search for collocates in COCA of: had better_RRR 1 START 82 2 PREPARED 59 You had better be prepared to push yourself harder than …

had better Read More »

ALLOCATE RESOURCES 3008

Here’s an example of this academic collocation: And this data is key because it really helps cities understand where people are using,  how to allocate resources and the effectiveness of programming over time.   A search in iWeb for allocat* resourc* 1 ALLOCATE RESOURCES 3008 2 ALLOCATING RESOURCES 1467 3 ALLOCATED RESOURCES 470 4 ALLOCATES RESOURCES 340 5 ALLOCATED RESOURCE 44 A collocate search in COCA for allocate resources: 1 HOW 19 2 EFFICIENTLY 9 …

ALLOCATE RESOURCES 3008 Read More »

‘He’s not that much better’ (not that much + COMPARATIVE)

  Yardbarker The Bears’ quarterback has been better of late, but not that much better. *’of late‘ means recently. Point 78 in ADJECTIVES/comparatives is defined as: ‘not that much’ to modify comparative adjectives to a small degree in iWeb: 1 NOT THAT MUCH BETTER 280 2 NOT THAT MUCH BIGGER 109 It’s just not that much bigger. gundogsupply.com (listen to a similar sentence) 3 NOT …

‘He’s not that much better’ (not that much + COMPARATIVE) Read More »

‘There’s no better example than China.’ (NO | ‘NOT ANY’ + comparative)

Let’s look at an expert example of limiting comparison: Now, these people are no more special than any of us. (listen to this sentence) ‘no more‘ = not more Point 74 in the category of ADJECTIVES is defined as: ‘no’ / ‘not any’ to limit the scale of comparison. (comparative clauses) *But really this grammar is equally useful with comparative adverb phrases. …

‘There’s no better example than China.’ (NO | ‘NOT ANY’ + comparative) Read More »

10 ways ‘FAR’ is used in English grammar.

Here are 10 ways ‘far’ is used ranked by order of frequency: 1. A2 general adverb *Numbers on the right are the frequency in iWeb corpus: (RR) 1578722 ‘far‘ means ‘at, to or from a great distance in space or time‘  For example: Is it far away? I don’t live far from here. Thailand is not far from Vietnam. 2. B1 phrase ‘so far‘ means ‘until now‘ So far …

10 ways ‘FAR’ is used in English grammar. Read More »