GSE

  • The Global Scale of English (GSE) is a language standard used by ‘Pearson’.
  • It extends the CEFR across a scale from 10 to 90.

*It has no grammar points listed at C2

comparative adjective + THAN + verb-ING

The English Grammar Profile B1 Point 84 in the category of CLAUSES is defined as: ‘than’ + a limited range of non-finite clauses (with -ing), forming the second part of a comparison after a comparative adjective This point partially overlaps PEARSON’S: GSE 62 B2 complex comparisons between verb/noun phrases VERB PHRASE 1/NOUN PHRASE 1 + …

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VERB + DIRECT OBJECT + to INFINITIVE

This post contains an example of overlapping B1 grammar points located inside two different categories in the English Grammar Profile (EGP). EGP B1 point 6 in the category of REPORTED SPEECH is defined as: REPORTED REQUESTS AND COMMANDS with ‘ask’ or ‘tell’ + direct object and ‘to-‘infinitive EGP B1 point 38 in the category of …

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‘What you see is what you get.’ (CLEFT CLAUSE)

The English Grammar Profile C1 point 10 in the category of FOCUS is defined as: ‘What’ + noun or pronoun + verb phrase as subject + ‘be’, for focus. Note that Pearson lists this point: GSE 59 B2 clauses with ‘What …’ to emphasise the topic or main point. For example: What we need now is a good night’s sleep. What I said was that I don’t need your help. …

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one | some + of the + SUPERLATIVE + PLURAL NOUN

Here are two expert examples of complex noun phrases as subject complements: Ocean worlds are some of the most fascinating places. Listen to this sentence   This is one of the most important things that any man can do. Listen *Note, ‘is one of the most‘ is the second most frequent 5-word Ngram. iWeb 262,288 In the English Grammar Profile, B1 point 41 in ADJECTIVES is defined as:  ‘ONE OF …

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‘whether * or not’ (conditional clause)

The ‘whether or not’ structure means ‘it is not important which possibility is true’.  Here’s an expert example of using ‘whether + clause + or not, + clause’: Whether we like it or not, motivation comes and motivation goes. TED The English Grammar Profile C2 point 130 in CLAUSES/conditional is defined as: ‘WHETHER OR NOT’, to introduce conditions in formal contexts. Pearson lists this at …

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NON-FINITE past participle CLAUSES

In the English Grammar Profile, C1 point 7 in the category of FOCUS is defined as: non-finite subordinate clause with an ‘-ed’ form, before a main clause, for focus, often in formal, academic or business contexts. Also see Pearson’s 76 GSE C1: add information using appended clauses with ‘being’ and/or passive participles. Given enough time, she‘ll do …

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At the end of the day (FOCUS EXPRESSIONS)

‘at the end of the day‘ can be used literally, meaning the time of day, but is also an informal phrase that means:  when everything is taken into consideration.   *It contains the most common 5 part N-gram in English: ‘at the end of the’ iWeb 392146 English Grammar Profile C1 Point 8 in the category …

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‘It is said that …’ (IT + passive)

Let’s take a look at an IELTS writing task 2 example with this grammar: It is argued that volunteering should be made a part of the school curriculum. In the above example, ‘is argued‘ forms the passive part.  The active form of this is probably: ‘People argue that…” In our example, ‘people’ is not important or maybe we don’t know who …

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‘He told me not to do it.’ (negative request)

The English Grammar Profile B2 point 14 in REPORTED SPEECH is defined as: ‘ask’ or ‘tell’ + direct object + ‘not’ + ‘to-‘infinitive. This point can be extended with Pearson’s GSE 60 B2 report orders, requests and advice with infinitive clauses. She told me not to do it. He warned us not to be late. *Pearson also includes an affirmative example: ‘She encouraged him to …

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OUGHT (negative OR questions)

There are three negative points in the English Grammar Profile at C2 Modality that are quite rare. Point 215 is defined as: negative form ‘ought not to’ Point 226: CONTRACTED NEGATIVE ‘oughtn’t’ (without ‘to’) + verb Point 235 ‘ought’ + subject + ‘not to’ + verb to form (rhetorical) questions, often in formal contexts. *Point …

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adjective + (that) clause

Here’s a student example of an adjective followed by a ‘that’ clause. However, I am sure that the most useful English for you is American English. PELIC Korean male level 4 writing In the English Grammar Profile (EGP), there are many points that are hard to differentiate and some have conflicting information. EGP point 22 MODALITY/adjectives at A2: BE’ + ‘SURE‘ + CLAUSE …

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‘BE’ + to infinitive | ‘BE’ + due to infinitive

In the English Grammar Profile (EGP), there are three similar points in the category of Future expressions with ‘BE’ at B2 in the English Grammar Profile. 47  ‘be due to’ and, more formally, ‘be to’ talk about things that are scheduled or expected. 53 OBLIGATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS WITH ‘BE TO’ 56 present form of ‘be’ …

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‘…, which is good.’ (evaluative relative clause)

In the English Grammar Profile, B2 Point 100 in the category of CLAUSES is hard to find formally as it is more USE related as the relative clause: refers to a whole clause or sentence, often to express an opinion or evaluation or give a reason. This is also found in PEARSON’S: GSE 61 B2 …

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as if | as though (COMPARISON)

Here are two very similar points at different levels under Clauses and comparatives in the English Grammar Profile.  They are unusual because the B1, the lower level of English ability, contains more complexity and is based more on natural collocation.  Indeed, to adhere to B2 definitions, one must avoid what vocabulary collocates most naturally. EGP …

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